Share “10 books that you were forced to read in...”


Deseret Digital Media NewsOK publishes content from Deseret Digital Media, which has a network of websites that includes KSL.com, DeseretNews.com and FamilyShare.com.

10 books that you were forced to read in junior high, but would change your life now as an adult

You might be pleasantly surprised to find that the books that you didn't enjoy as a kid are actually fantastic as an adult.
Katelyn Carmen, KSL Modified: August 21, 2014 at 8:49 pm •  Published: August 22, 2014
Advertisement

With the kids back at school, it is a great time to wipe off the summer dust from your bookshelf and start your fall reading.

Although the newest New York Times bestseller might be calling your name, you may consider selecting an old childhood reading assignment instead (given that you actually READ the book, instead of just relying on Spark Notes summaries).

You probably did not appreciate forced reading during junior high, but you may find a greater appreciation and understanding for the same books as adult.

Here are just a few classics that you should seriously reconsider rereading:

1. "The Giver" (Lois Lowry)

Imagine a society where mankind's right to make decisions for themselves is taken away. The story follows a boy named Jonas, who is chosen to receive all the memories of the past, in order to help the Elders make decisions for their community. This intriguing tale has an underlying Christian theme that emphasizes the importance of pain, life, love and family.

The movie version (now playing in theaters) has an all-star cast including Meryl Streep, Taylor Swift, Katie Holmes, and Jeff Bridges. Although there are some minor changes from the books, it holds true to the original message, and it is an intriguing retelling of the story.

2. "To Kill a Mockingbird" (Harper Lee)

This American classic takes on the subject of racism in the Deep South. It is narrated by Scout Finch, a young girl whose father, Atticus Finch, is a lawyer. Although he is highly opposed by members of the community, he chooses to protect Tom Robinson, a African-American man who is wrongfully accused of raping a white woman.

3. "A Wrinkle in Time" (Madeleine L'Engle)

Don't be deceived, this sci-fi novel is not a cheesy children's book. After their brilliant, scientist father goes missing, Meg, her brother, friend, and a band of supernatural beings head off on an amazing journey through time and space to discover where he is being held captive.

Continue reading this story on the...