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11 cartoon characters who buck stereotypes

Here's a look at 11 different cartoon characters who didn't follow in the footsteps of their stereotypes.
Herb Scribner, Deseret News Modified: July 22, 2014 at 9:14 pm •  Published: July 23, 2014
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It’s Saturday morning. What are you doing?

If you’re a parent, you’re probably watching cartoons with your kid. And if you’re a kid, you’re probably seeing what antics Spongebob is getting into this week — though that may not exactly be healthy for you, research has found.

But no mater the long-term effects of cartoons, early morning TV shows do have an impact on children, Dr. Dimitri Christakis, director of the Center for Child Health, Behavior and Development of the University of Washington in Seattle, told CNN.

"The point of this study and a lot of other research in media is that what your kids watch is as important as how much they watch. It's not just about turning off the television, it's about changing the channel," Christakis said.

This shows that what your kids watch impacts what they think in the future, which places even more importance on the kinds of messages our children take in daily from the media.

As a result, we decided to put together a list of cartoon characters that have bucked the trend when it comes to gender stereotypes throughout history — something that kids have even noticed.

Here are 11 of our favorites that have diverted from the common conception:

Charlotte Pickles — “Rugrats”

Charlotte Pickles, Angelica's mom, might as well have had her phone attached directly to her ear. She was always busy working and being the boss, which isn’t exactly easy for women, the Harvard Business Review found.

Chas Finster — “Rugrats”

Father to young Chuckie, Chas Finster bucked the trend of the single-parent stereotype. Statistics show that most single parents are single mothers, though this has shifted in recent years as more single fathers are coming into the fray, the Pew Research Center found.

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