2013 House of Hope to benefit foundation for sick children

Proceeds from sale of the House of Hope will be donated by the Oklahoma Home Builders Foundation to the Cavett Kids Foundation, whose mission is “to provide positive experiences for courageous kids diagnosed with life-threatening illnesses.”
BY TIM FALL trfall@gmail.com Modified: September 12, 2013 at 12:03 pm •  Published: September 14, 2013

— Philanthropy stumbled slightly in the economic downturn, but for the Central Oklahoma Home Builders Association it is far from dead.

The 2013 House of Hope, 3504 Sagebrush Place in Yukon, was provided for the annual Oklahoma Home Builders Foundation fundraiser by Carl and Carolyn Schluter, co-founders of Raywood Homes.

When donations of services and materials were not forthcoming this year from the builder community to construct a House of Hope free and clear, the Schluters were ready to step in with their model home in the Raywood Manor addition.

“They have hearts the size of Texas,” said Laurie Matthews of American Eagle Title Group, 2013 chairman for the House of Hope project.

The House of Hope will be open to the public from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday for the grand opening.

Carolyn Schluter said that she and her husband, who have built homes together for 25 years, were “happy for an opportunity to do the right thing.”

This year, the “right thing” takes the form of a gift. Proceeds from sale of the House of Hope will be donated by the Oklahoma Home Builders Foundation to the Cavett Kids Foundation, whose mission is “to provide positive experiences for courageous kids diagnosed with life-threatening illnesses,” according to Cavett Executive Director Jenny Rodgers.

The organization is able to provide support, including camps, an annual Christmas party and even direct cash assistance for up to 50 families coping with the illness of a child, said Pamela Duncan, president of the Cavett Foundation.

The 2,561-square foot home, with one story and a stone facade, lists for $304,750.

Entering the house, visitors are drawn in to the large family room, complete with a stone hearth, and a paneled wall of picture windows looking out to the patio and fully fenced backyard.

A formal dining room that could serve as a study opens off the foyer, with its vaulted ceiling and an Old World-style front door.

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