2nd lost hiker rescued from Calif. forest

Published on NewsOK Modified: April 4, 2013 at 7:58 pm •  Published: April 4, 2013
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Her rescuers said she couldn't remember what day it was or even that she had gone hiking. She had no idea how she had gotten on to the steep, rocky canyon outcropping where they found her.

She was suffering from low blood pressure, shortness of breath and had pain in both legs and one hand.

Despite that, she suffered no major internal injuries and was listed in good condition at the University of California, Irvine, Medical Center, said hospital spokesman John Murray.

Like Cendoya, she was being treated for dehydration and was expected to be hospitalized for several days.

At Mission Hospital, Dr. Michael Ritter told reporters Cendoya said he survived by taking shelter at night in heavy brush and passing his days by praying.

"He's got a lot of faith in the Lord, which I think will help him to work his way through this," Ritter said shortly before Jack was located.

Cendoya told doctors he and Jack became separated sometime Sunday night.

He was found on a steep hill less than a mile from where the pair had left their car, but the brush was so thick that a person wouldn't be able to see someone standing as close as five feet away, Park said. Jack was found nearby.

The area is just 500 feet from a dirt road that is fairly heavily traveled, but Park said Cendoya was so disoriented he likely wasn't aware of that.

"He was in an area near where people were calling his name and he didn't even know it," Park said.

Brush in the area was so dense that even after he was found, a helicopter dispatched to rescue him had trouble keeping track of where he was. Two volunteer searchers got lost themselves and had to be flown out Wednesday afternoon.

Cendoya says on his Facebook page that he's a 2011 graduate of Orange County's Costa Mesa High School and a student at Orange Coast College. A number of photos show the athletic-looking young man working out and lifting weights.

He and Jack are believed to have gotten lost near near Holy Jim Trail, a tree-lined dirt path along a creek that leads to the waterfall.

The path is popular with day hikers, including families with children, and is not considered particularly difficult. Park warned, however, that it's very easy to get lost in the heavy brush and hikers who venture in should be prepared with plenty of food, water and proper clothing.

The area is in a section of forest in the Santa Ana Mountains that lie along the border of Orange and Riverside counties southeast of Los Angeles. The trail ranges in elevation from about 2,000 feet to about 4,000 feet.

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Associated Press writers John Rogers, Andrew Dalton, Christopher Weber and Robert Jablon contributed to this story from Los Angeles.