5 free things to do in historic Boston

Published on NewsOK Modified: March 20, 2014 at 10:33 am •  Published: March 20, 2014
Advertisement
;

BOSTON (AP) — The city of Boston is known for its "wicked" rich history, to use a term the locals love, going back to the Boston Tea Party and roots of the American Revolution. But pride is not limited to the past: The city is also home to the World Series champion Red Sox team.

Historic landmarks are scattered across the downtown from 17th century churches and meetinghouses to some of the nation's oldest schools. And taking in the sites won't cost you a penny. Just remember that the cramped vintage streets are better tackled on foot than by car.

This spring will mark the one-year anniversary of a tragic event in the resilient city's recent history: the Boston Marathon bombing, which will be marked by a memorial service. The marathon takes place this year on April 21.

FREEDOM TRAIL

The city's most trekked tourist attraction is the 2.5-mile (4-kilometer) bricked pathway that takes visitors on a tour of Boston's past. The route starts in the heart of the city at Boston Common and winds its way over the Charles River to Charlestown to the site of the Battle of Bunker Hill. Visitors can stop at any of the 16 designated sites from museums to graveyards to churches and meetinghouses dating back to the 17th century.

One notable spot is the home of Paul Revere, famous for the ride he made on horseback to warn colonists that the British were coming. The 1680 wooden home is the oldest existing building downtown.

Another memorable site is the nation's oldest public school, called the Boston Latin School, which was attended by four signers of the Declaration of Independence: Ben Franklin, Samuel Adams, John Hancock and Robert Treat Paine.

The trail also passes the Old South Meeting House where colonists planned their protest against the British tax on tea. The event became known as the Boston Tea Party, where revolutionists dumped 340 crates of tea into the city harbor.

Continue reading this story on the...