’99 tornadoes taught lessons, Oklahoma weather experts say

BY JAMES S. TYREE Modified: May 2, 2009 at 11:01 am •  Published: May 2, 2009

/> "There is no one single means of warning that’s going to reach everybody,” Kitch said.

Television meteorologists also shared how severe weather is covered now compared with 1999. A common theme, besides improved technology to forecast storms, was making sure anyone in the viewing area who could be affected by severe weather was made fully aware of the situation.

KFOR-4 meteorologist Mike Morgan said as incredible weather radar data was coming in on May 3, he wanted to provide all the latest information without causing a panic.

"Really, I was worried about giving people heart attacks,” he said. "Maybe I was a little too soft.”



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