A look at 10 historic sites saved, 10 lost in 2013

Published on NewsOK Modified: January 3, 2014 at 10:39 am •  Published: January 3, 2014
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The National Trust for Historic Preservation compiled a list of 10 historic preservation saves and losses from 2013.

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10 Sites Saved:

1. Peavey Plaza, Minneapolis, Minn. — Preservationists persuaded the Minneapolis City Council to drop a demolition plan and undertake a rehabilitation plan instead.

2. Jensen-Byrd, Spokane, Wash. — Preservationists persuaded Washington State University to restore and reuse this 104-year-old former warehouse, rather than sell and demolish the structure.

3. Fort Monroe, Hampton, Va. — Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell approved a master plan to restore and revitalize this former military base.

4. Stamford Post Office, Stamford, Conn. — A federal court ruled against the sale and demolition plan for this historic post office. The ruling could help preservationists save historic post offices nationwide.

5. Montana's Upper Missouri River Breaks, Central Montana — The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit ruled the Bureau of Land Management violated laws protecting historic sites along this national monument.

6. Terminal Island, Port of Los Angeles — Vacant historic buildings at this former shipbuilding center from World War I and World War II could be saved under a plan approved by the Los Angeles Board of Harbor Commissioners.

7. Wrigley Field, Chicago — Earlier plans for massive renovations of this historic ballpark have been amended to address the concerns of preservationists.

8. Five National Monuments designated by President Barack Obama — Each site represents a diverse chapter in American history from the Native American and Latino communities of Rio Grande del Norte to the Underground Railroad and the Buffalo Soldiers of the Civil War.

9. New Orleans' Saenger Theatre — This historic 1920s movie house and performing arts space was severely damaged in Hurricane Katrina but reopened to the public in October after rehabilitation.

10. Waterfront, Charleston, S.C. — A federal court found the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers violated preservation laws when it approved the construction of new cruise ship terminals on the waterfront.