A look inside Wash. state's $33.6B budget plan

Published on NewsOK Modified: June 28, 2013 at 11:29 pm •  Published: June 28, 2013
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About $500 million of the budget is funded by a variety of transfers, and about half of that money would come from the state's public works assistance account, meaning there will be fewer dollars available to support such local projects. That shift upset local government officials.

Lawmakers also save a lot of money by implementing President Barack Obama's health care law thanks to more federal money.

— NEW SPENDING: The budget includes a range of smaller items, creating new government entities or adding spending in new areas.

For example, the budget creates a Geoduck Harvest Safety Committee to submit recommendations that may establish a safety program for divers seeking the mollusks native to the Pacific Northwest. The total cost? $265,000. Another $500,000 is allocated to handle weed management and work on the eradication of noxious weeds.

The University of Washington will receive $7 million to create a Clean Energy Institute and a Center on Ocean Acidification in order to conduct research on their namesake issues. Such environmental matters have been a focus of Gov. Jay Inslee. Meanwhile, a Washington State University program will get $600,000 to conduct public outreach on non-lethal ways of limiting conflict between livestock and wild carnivores, and lawmakers spend another $2 million to purchase scientific equipment for Washington State University biomedical and health sciences building in Spokane.

Another $50,000 is provided to conduct a cost and impact study of Covington Town Center. That's the home city of House Majority Leader Pat Sullivan.

The governor's office would get a new director of military affairs, at a total cost of $300,000. The person would help the governor's office coordinate with state agencies and local communities on military issues. The state already has an adjutant general of the Military Department that oversees the National Guard and emergency response matters.