A state-by-state look at superstorm's effects

Associated Press Modified: November 2, 2012 at 9:31 pm •  Published: November 2, 2012
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The massive storm that started out as Hurricane Sandy slammed into the East Coast and morphed into a huge and problematic system, killing at least 105 people in the United States. Power outages now stand at more than 3.5 million homes and businesses, down from a peak of 8.5 million. Here's a snapshot of what is happening, state by state.

CONNECTICUT

Gas shortages in the New York area sends motorists across state lines to Connecticut in search of fuel. Lines form at gas stations near Interstate 95. Memorial service planned Saturday for volunteer Easton firefighter Russell Neary, killed during the storm while clearing tree debris from a road. Deaths: 3. Power outages: 227,500, down from a peak of 625,000.

MASSACHUSETTS

As Massachusetts returns to normal, it sends volunteers and National Guard members to help in storm-battered New York. Massachusetts' federally-owned T.S. Kennedy heading to Elizabeth, N.J., on Sunday. The 540-foot ship will serve as a "hotel" for emergency workers, power crews and others helping the region get back on its feet. Deaths: None. Power outages: about 1,000, down from 400,000.

NEW HAMPSHIRE

Officials estimate it will be the weekend before power is fully restored. Deaths: 1. Power outages: 1,300, down from 210,000.

NEW JERSEY

The state police raised the death toll from the storm to 22, up from 14. Atlantic City's 12 casinos, closed in advance of the storm, start reopening after Gov. Chris Christie gives them the OK. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood views the storm damage in Ocean County. Motorists face another day of long lines for gas. Unemployment benefits are made available to two more counties where residents lost jobs because of the storm. The state sets up a hotline to help pet owners find their pets. Deaths: 22. Power outages: 1.5 million, down from 2.7 million.

NEW YORK

Mayor Michael Bloomberg canceled the New York City Marathon after mounting criticism that it was wrong to hold it while the region is still recovering from superstorm Sandy. The cost of the storm could exceed $18 billion in New York alone. Gov. Andrew Cuomo told utilities to step up power repair work or risk losing business in the state. With fuel shortages, motorists fumed in long lines at gas stations around New York City. All three of the city's major airports were back open. Subway and commuter rail services were partly restored. The state created a $100 million fund to help people hit the hardest. Deaths: 48, including 41 in New York City. Power outages: Nearly 1.2 million, down from 2.2 million.

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