A state-by-state look at the Northeast snowstorm

Published on NewsOK Modified: February 11, 2013 at 2:33 am •  Published: February 11, 2013
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A look at effects in states and provinces in the path of the massive storm that swept across the Northeast U.S. and southern Canada:

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CONNECTICUT

The storm dumped at as much as 3 feet of snow on Connecticut, paralyzing much of the state. President Barack Obama declared a state of emergency for the state, allowing federal aid to be used in recovery.

Five deaths apparently were weather related, Gov. Dannel P. Malloy said, including a 73-year-old man who died when he fell while cleaning up in Danbury. The National Guard was brought in to help clear snow in New Haven, which got 34 inches. Snow totals were 32 inches in Manchester and 20 inches in Danbury.

The governor ordered all roads closed for nearly a day, and even emergency responders got stuck on highways. About 38,000 homes and businesses were without power at the storm's peak. By early Monday, 1,225 were left without electricity.

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MAINE

Portland set a record snowfall reading of 31.9 inches, the National Weather Service said, and blowing snow reduced visibility on the coast. The weather contributed to a fatal crash.

Vehicles, including state police cruisers, were stuck in the deep snow, state police said, warning that stranded drivers should expect long waits for tow trucks. About 12,000 homes and businesses lost power.

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MASSACHUSETTS

Boston was blanketed in up to 2 feet of snow, falling short of the city's record of 27.6 inches set in 2003. In some communities just outside the city, totals were higher, including 30 inches in both Quincy and Framingham. Hardest hit were the South Shore and Cape Cod, but there were no serious injuries due to flooding, the governor said.

An 11-year-old boy died of carbon monoxide poisoning after being overcome as he sat in a running car to keep warm, while his father was shoveling snow to get the car out of a snow bank in Boston's Dorchester neighborhood. A Boston man believed to be in his 20s also died of carbon monoxide poisoning in a running, snowed-in car. Also, a longtime member of the Worcester Fire Department suffered a heart attack after shoveling snow at his Webster home Saturday and died at a hospital.

Public transit in the city was suspended, and authorities expected to have trains and buses running in time for Monday morning's commute. Logan Airport was closed until late Saturday.

More than 400,000 customers lost power in the state, and some were warned to expect to be without it for days. Many areas were too dangerous to send in crews, utility NStar said. Crews whittled the total down to just over 126,000 outages by early Monday.

The state enforced its first travel ban on roads since the Blizzard of '78, a ferocious storm that dropped 27 inches of snow, packed hurricane-force winds and claimed dozens of lives.