A year later, some like Christmas NBA start better

Published on NewsOK Modified: December 26, 2012 at 2:00 pm •  Published: December 26, 2012
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NEW YORK (AP) — Doc Rivers left home for the holiday, lost the game, and loved every minute of it.

"That was perfect," Rivers said, recalling the Boston Celtics' 2011-12 season opener. "I just think it was awesome."

A year after the NBA started its season on Christmas out of necessity, Rivers and others think it's something the league should consider doing regularly. The 2011-12 schedule consisted of 66 games, and while even the advocates for the later start aren't certain how many should be played, they believe it's something worth exploring.

"I think starting on Christmas Day would be better and then going later into July, I think that would be better so the start of our season wasn't overshadowed as much by NFL football and college football," ABC and ESPN analyst Jeff Van Gundy said. "If you did that, obviously you'd have to extend into July a little bit. But I think 66 games, the only bad thing about that would be people losing some money and so because of that, no one's ever going to do that. It would certainly be better for the product."

A normal 82-game schedule was impossible last season when owners and players couldn't agree to a new labor contract in time. The lockout dragged into November before a tentative agreement was struck on Thanksgiving weekend. It was ratified two weeks later, abbreviated training camps opened Dec. 9, and teams had a little more than two weeks to prepare for the start of the season.

After the expected complaints about lack of preparation and possibility of injury, the season opened with hype that's rarely there for the usual start around Halloween. The first game was in New York, where the Knicks withstood a last shot by Kevin Garnett to hold off the Celtics.

"I thought that game — I thought it was so anticipated, lot of fun. The buzz in Madison Square Garden was amazing," Rivers said. "I really did, I thought it was absolutely wonderful, the timing with football almost over, people ready for basketball."

With football king, even the NBA seems to realize it should lie low in the fall. ABC doesn't begin its national TV schedule until its Christmas doubleheader, and the league and its TV partners kick the hype machine into gear leading into the holiday, with statistics galore about who's played most often, who's played best, who's wearing what uniform, and anything else that can help build the buzz.

It works. ESPN scored its highest-rated Christmas tripleheader for Tuesday's games, and the Knicks-Lakers matchup that opened ABC's doubleheader generated a 5.9 overnight rating, highest ever for an ABC game in that slot.

Rivers thinks it could be even bigger, proposing adding to the fun with some kind of season-opening spectacle, similar to the popular college tournaments.

Minnesota coach Rick Adelman agreed the later start was fine, but like Rivers said there were too many games crammed in afterward. The league finished only about a week later than its regular schedule, forcing teams to play on three straight nights at least once to fit everything in.

Problem is, the return to the regular schedule hasn't offered much relief.

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