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Accessories Council launches USA-Made campaign

ELIZABETH WELLINGTON
Philadelphia Inquirer
Modified: June 25, 2012 at 4:27 pm •  Published: June 25, 2012
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photo - Designers and buyers mingled at the Accessories Council trade show in midtown Manhattan, May 8, 2012, as they showcased Made in USA jewelry. Here Satu Greenberg, of Tuleste Market, shows off one of her necklaces. (Ed Hille/Philadelphia Inquirer/MCT)
Designers and buyers mingled at the Accessories Council trade show in midtown Manhattan, May 8, 2012, as they showcased Made in USA jewelry. Here Satu Greenberg, of Tuleste Market, shows off one of her necklaces. (Ed Hille/Philadelphia Inquirer/MCT)

Faux bling is making Karen Giberson a wee bit nervous this misty morning.

Giberson, president of the national Accessories Council, is headed from her home in Media, Pa., to Manhattan's Fashion Center to launch USA-Made, an ambitious project aimed at helping costume jewelry designers manufacture the bulk of their baubles in America.

"This can spark a lot of change in the industry," Giberson said as she anxiously scrolled through Women's Wear Daily's morning news while riding the Amtrak Cafe Car. "If everyone could make a little bit more in the U.S., we can make a lot of difference."

It seems like a no-brainer. The fashion industry increasingly seems to be pointing out the posh factor of buying things made here, especially during an election year where jobs on American soil is a debate hot-topic. Certainly, independent boutiques like to rave about local designers to their niche customers.

"This is an amazing opportunity for us," said Jeanne Lawler Frank, president of Bridgeport, Pa.-based watch label Options In Time. "And it's a way to tell our customers we care about them ... that we care about jobs ... that we care about our country."

But when it comes to specialty and department store chains that cater to larger audiences concerned just as much with affordability as with quality, it's a harder sell. Even as designers realize that manufacturing products stateside can be more affordable, there are still few workers here who have certain jewelry-making skills, including creating detailed settings and working with semiprecious stones. That means American-made detailed designs will cost more than the same work done overseas. For example, jeweler-to-the-stars R.J. Graziano makes mixed metals and gold statement pieces ranging from $25 to $125 retail; similar-looking USA-Made products will cost between $75 and $250.

"Our customer is most interested in high-end products," said Lincoln Moore, fashion director of women's accessories at Saks Fifth Avenue, as he perused collections at the USA-Made show, including necklaces by design duo Tuleste and R.J. Graziano. "She wants good quality at a good value. She's an aspirational shopper."

Even for companies interested in blowing the made-in-America horn, they face a marketing challenge. Having already invested in jewelry made overseas, they would be forced to sell the American jewelry alongside the other pieces.

"By default," said Giberson, "are you pointing out that things aren't made here?"

Twenty-five years ago, roughly 80 percent of costume jewelry was made in America, Giberson said. The bulk of the plants were located in New England, especially Rhode Island and Massachusetts. Through the 1980s and 1990s, however, as businesses seeking cheaper labor built manufacturing plants in Asia, local costume jewelers weren't able to pass down the skills of the trade. These days, Giberson said, 95 percent of costume jewelry is made in China.

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