AgCenter studying switchgrass as biofuel

Associated Press Modified: November 4, 2012 at 10:00 am •  Published: November 4, 2012
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Hal Liechty, a forest ecologist and hydrologist at the University of Arkansas-Monticello and the University of Arkansas's Division of Agriculture, is looking at nutrient in switchgrass and cottonwood trees compared to traditional row crops

"Nutrient retention is a problem in the lower Mississippi River Valley," Liechty said. "One of the things we see with the bioenergy crops that we're looking at, cottonwood and switchgrass is they are really good at retaining nutrients."

Switchgrass stores carbon in its roots. Increasing carbon in the soil can potentially improve soil quality and crop productivity.

Liechty is looking at whether the plants hold enough carbon to qualify landowners for carbon credits.



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