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Airlines get fewer complaints in a study despite poor service records

The researchers have graded airlines since 1991 on government figures for on-time performance, mishandled bags, bumping passengers, and complaints filed with the U.S. Department of Transportation.
By DAVID KOENIG, Associated Press Published: April 8, 2014
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A big drop in customer complaints helped U.S. airlines post their best ratings ever even though more flights were late and more bags were mishandled, according to a report released Monday by university researchers.

Virgin America topped the ratings, and three regional airlines scored at the bottom.

Among the four biggest airlines, Delta ranked best followed by Southwest, American and United, according to researchers from Wichita State University and Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.

The researchers have graded airlines since 1991 on government figures for on-time performance, mishandled bags, bumping passengers, and complaints filed with the U.S. Department of Transportation.

Their key findings

On-time performance: Airlines operated 78.4 percent of their flights on time in 2013, down from 81.8 percent in 2012. Best: Hawaiian Airlines; worst: American Eagle. Only two airlines improved: American Airlines and United.

Bag handling: The rate of lost, stolen or delayed bags rose 5 percent. Best: Virgin America; worst: American Eagle.

Bumping: The rate of bumping passengers from flights fell 8 percent. Best: JetBlue Airways; worst: SkyWest.

Complaints: Consumer complaints to the government dropped 15 percent in 2013 after rising 20 percent the year before. Best: Southwest Airlines; worst: Frontier.

One of the report’s authors, Wichita State business professor Dean Headley, credited the drop in complaints partly to United Airlines. The airline company suffered several computer-network outages and grounded hundreds of flights in 2012 when it combined the United and Continental computer networks after a merger, but “got their act together” in 2013, he said.

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Airlines sour on fruit cost

Airline passengers might notice something missing these days from their vodka tonics or Diet Cokes: the lime.

A recent shortage and spike in price has caused some airlines — for now — to stop offering the fruit.

“We temporarily pulled limes about two weeks ago, due to skyrocketing lime prices,” says Alaska Airlines spokeswoman Halley Knigge. She says the airline normally goes through about 900 limes a day.

Lime growers in the Mexican state of Michoacan have reduced their supply because of unrest caused by drug cartels and flooding from heavy rains. That, combined with drought in California and an overall growing demand for limes, has driven up prices to a three-year high.

The average advertised price of a lime in U.S. supermarkets was 56 cents last week, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. That’s up from 37 cents the week ending March 28 and 31 cents a year ago.

United Airlines has had to make do with lemons, blaming the California drought. “We still serve limes, though they’re more difficult to source. So, on some flights we’re substituting with lemons,” says spokesman Rahsaan Johnson.

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