Americans anxious, irritated as gov't shuts down

Published on NewsOK Modified: October 1, 2013 at 1:04 pm •  Published: October 1, 2013
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NEW YORK (AP) — The partial government shutdown that began Tuesday threw into turmoil the household finances of some federal workers, with many facing unpaid furloughs or delays in paychecks.

Park ranger and father-to-be Darquez Smith said he already lives paycheck to paycheck while putting himself through college and worried how he'll fare if the checks stop coming.

"I've got a lot on my plate right now — tuition, my daughter, bills," said Smith, 23, a ranger at Dayton Aviation Heritage National Historical Park in Ohio. "I'm just confused and waiting just like everyone else."

Robert Turner, 45, a building mechanic at the Smithsonian's American History museum in Washington, said he and co-workers were heading in for several hours to turn off the water and take out the trash. Then, he planned to go to Ocean City, Md., and return when he's called back.

"After next week if we're not working I'm going to have to find a job," Turner said, explaining he doesn't want to have to eat into savings.

A Monday deadline to avert the shutdown passed amid a budget impasse in Congress, leaving thousands of federal workers idled and most non-essential government services halted for the first time in nearly two decades. Millions of Americans were unable to get government services ranging from federally backed home loans to supplemental food assistance for children and pregnant women.

The impact of the shutdown was mixed — immediate and far-reaching for some, annoying but minimal for others.

In Colorado, where flooding killed eight people earlier this month, emergency funds to help rebuild homes and businesses continued to flow — but federal worker furloughs were expected to slow it down.

National Guard soldiers rebuilding washed-out roads would apparently be paid on time — along with the rest of the country's active-duty personnel — under a bill passed hours before the shutdown. Existing Social Security and Medicare benefits, veterans' services and mail delivery were also unaffected.

Other agencies were harder hit — nearly 3,000 Federal Aviation Administration safety inspectors were furloughed along with most of the National Transportation Safety Board's employees, including accident investigators who respond to air crashes, train collisions, pipeline explosions and other accidents.

Almost all of NASA shut down, except for Mission Control in Houston, and national parks closed along with the Smithsonian museums and the National Zoo. Even the zoo's popular panda cam went dark, shut off for the first time since a cub was born there Aug. 23.

Federal workers would not see their pay affected right away. If a shutdown continues, all employees can expect to be paid on schedule on Oct. 15, 2013, for hours worked from Sept. 22 through Sept. 30.