Analyst: Obesity statistics support a serving of skepticism

BY J. JUSTIN WILSON Published: September 4, 2013
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Moreover, the activists' command-and-control plan for food ignores half of the obesity equation: physical activity. You gain weight by eating more calories than you burn in physical activity, not by consuming supposedly “bad” foods. Sure enough, Colorado and Louisiana aren't alike in exercise: Centers for Disease Control data show that more than 60 percent of Coloradans meet guidelines for 30 minutes of moderate aerobic physical activity per day, compared with 42 percent of Louisianans. (Coloradans may live in a more envious environment for outdoor activity than a Gulf Coast bayou, but certainly this doesn't mean food is to blame.)

Physical activity offers another benefit that invasive regulation of foods can't: It can be fun. You don't have to take after my fellow exercise nuts and do hours of CrossFit and white-water kayaking to fight fat. Something as simple as walking the dog can make an impact on personal weight. Unlike an “intervention” designed to make you hate eating, you might enjoy it.

Wilson is the senior research analyst at the Center for Consumer Freedom (www.consumerfreedom.com).

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