Another cold day in Oklahoma with power still out for many

BY MICHAEL KIMBALL Modified: January 31, 2010 at 2:42 pm •  Published: January 31, 2010

The lingering fog has helped keep temperatures in the 20s today in most of central and western Oklahoma, dimming hopes of a climb to the 40s Monday, weather officials said.

The ice and snow from the storm Thursday and Friday has helped the fog stick around, National Weather Service meteorologist Alex Lamers said. A longer climb to get above freezing Monday means temperatures will likely peak in the high 30s in the Oklahoma City metro.

"We might have gotten to the low 30s today if we got a few spots of sunshine," Lamers said.

Temperatures at Oklahoma Mesonet sites in far northwestern parts of the state and the Panhandle were in the low and mid-30s about 2:30 p.m., and sites in far southeastern Oklahoma reached the upper 30s and 40s. All other Mesonet stations were mired in the 20s.

High level clouds will remain in place along with a mass of cold air, according to the weather service. Melting and sublimation of ice and snow will continue, but will be limited because of the lack of sunshine.

Patches of freezing drizzle are possible across central and northern Oklahoma on Monday morning, forecasters said.

At least three deaths attributed to storm so far

At least three people died in incidents blamed on the storm, said Michelann Ooten, spokeswoman for the state Emergency Management Department.

A 70-year-old Ada woman, whose name has not been released, was using a generator Friday after she lost power and died when a propane tank used to fuel it exploded, Ooten said.

A 73-year-old Pontotoc County man, whose name also was not released, died Saturday in a house fire caused by a wood-burning stove he was using because of a power outage.

Rubin Rodriguez, 33, died this morning near Holdenville when his car veered off the road on a snow-covered embankment and hit a culvert, the Oklahoma Highway Patrol reported.

The state Health Department reported at least 325 people were hurt in slips and falls on the ice, 70 were hurt in wrecks and eight were poisoned by carbon monoxide since the storm hit Thursday.


Airport’s schedule thaws out

Will Rogers World Airport has begun to return to normal operations after last week’s winter storm interrupted service for two days. Conditions at the airport prevented planes from arriving Friday, which led to the cancellation of early flights,

Carney said. But runways are clear and airplanes have begun to travel to and from the city. That doesn’t mean flights won’t be delayed, Carney said. The storm has moved east and Carney

advised travelers to contact their airlines to check on flights. Over a three-day period, the storm caused more than 200 cancellations.

AARON CRESPO, Staff Writer

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