Antelope hunt worth it on two fronts

Going to the Oklahoma Panhandle nets a buck, quality time with dad
BY JEFF PUCKETT, For The Oklahoman Modified: September 29, 2012 at 10:48 pm •  Published: September 29, 2012
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photo - Jeff Puckett of Norman poses with the antelope he killed earlier this month in the Oklahoma Panhandle. Last year, the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation received 8,556 applications for the 315 antelope gun hunt permits that were available. Oklahoma allows restricted hunting of antelope with guns in Texas and Cimarron counties. Photo Provided
Jeff Puckett of Norman poses with the antelope he killed earlier this month in the Oklahoma Panhandle. Last year, the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation received 8,556 applications for the 315 antelope gun hunt permits that were available. Oklahoma allows restricted hunting of antelope with guns in Texas and Cimarron counties. Photo Provided

My cellphone rang early in the morning of July 11. It was my hunting buddy, Mark Braley, who is the Internal Affairs captain at the Norman Police Department where I work.

It wasn't hunting season so I was hesitant to answer it. I figured nothing good could come from the call.

I was wrong. Mark called to remind me to check the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation's website to see if I had drawn any of the bonus hunts offered by the agency through its controlled hunts program.

Mark had drawn a tag for an archery deer hunt at the McAlester Army Ammunition Plant and another friend of ours had drawn a tag for doe antelope gun hunt in the Panhandle.

I was wishing for an elk tag for the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge and had forgotten that I also had applied for one of the 50 either sex antelope tags for Cimarron County.

I checked my computer at work later that morning and began to hoot and holler when I realized I had drawn one of the coveted antelope tags for a four-day gun hunt in early September.

Finding a place to hunt

But what was I to do with the tag? Most of the land in Cimarron County is privately owned, and I had to find a place to hunt.

After some research online and from Wildlife Department literature, I decided to try and get permission to hunt on private land rather than rely on the public lands of the Rita Blanca Wildlife Management Area.

I remembered that a large ranch west of Boise City was operated by Tracy Brown's father-in-law. Brown was a state trooper I had met in Guymon several years ago.

I tracked Tracy down and he secured for me one of three hunting spots allowed by the ranch at the cost of a trespass fee.

In August, an assignment took me to Guymon so I took advantage to go scout the ranch.

I discovered that the Santa Fe Trail had wound its way through a portion of the ranch and Autograph Rock was on the property.

Autograph Rock was a location on the creek where wagon trains would stop. People would camp at the site and would carve their names in the rock and the dates they were there.

Tracy guided me to see the antelope on the ranch. One group had 14 bucks in it with at least 4 shooters.

It was easy to see why so many antelope were there. Because of the ranching practices, there was plenty of water and grass, even in the drought.

After Tracy had shown me the ranch, he introduced me to his in-laws, Dan and Carol Sharp. Dan's love of the land became apparent as he talked about the ranch and some of its history.

Dan is a steward of the land and doesn't complain about the antelope eating the grass for his cattle, even when he had to scale back ranching operations because of the drought.

The hunt for prairie goats: Day one

I returned for the hunt earlier this month with my father. We patiently sat in a blind near a watering hole near the top of a long ridge where the antelope liked to travel up and down.

It was not long after first daylight when would see antelope in the distance. Within an hour, we had our first encounter with a great buck.

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