Argentina split emerging over football philosophy

Published on NewsOK Modified: June 19, 2014 at 1:25 pm •  Published: June 19, 2014
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BELO HORIZONTE, Brazil (AP) — The first week of the World Cup has exposed signs of an identity crisis in Argentina, with coach Alejandro Sabella and captain Lionel Messi presenting different visions of how the team should play.

Sabella talks about being flexible and adjusting the formation depending on the opponent, while Messi says Argentina — being the football power that it is — should stick to its attacking style regardless of who it plays.

The difference in perspective was underscored by Messi's thinly-veiled criticism of how Sabella lined up the team in Argentina's opening 2-1 win over Bosnia-Herzegovina in Group F.

The coach fielded a cautious formation with five defenders, three midfielders and two strikers, before switching in the second half to the 4-3-3 system that Messi prefers.

One by one, other Argentina players have come out siding with Messi, saying they also believe in a three-man attack, while denying that there's a rift between the players and the coach.

"He (Messi) gave his opinion, like many others did. And that's it," backup goalkeeper Mariano Andujar said Wednesday. "There is no problem. Everyone is free to have their opinion."

After the Bosnia match, Sabella acknowledged that the team played better in the second half, when Messi, who scored in the 65th minute, dropped behind Sergio Aguero and Gonzalo Higuain in a three-man forward line. He is likely to stick with that formation against Iran on Saturday.

But the issue appears to extend beyond numbers. Sabella and Messi don't speak the same language when they talk about Argentina's core identity as a football team.

Before the game, Sabella dismissed questions about Argentina being among the "favorites" to win the World Cup, saying he dislikes the word. Then he admitted that — on the eve of the match — he hadn't yet decided how the team should play against the attack-minded Bosnians.

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