Digging out from snowstorm requires creativity, hard work

Snow shovels and front-end loaders — and less conventional tools like a plastic office calendar — were out in full force Wednesday as metro-area residents used whatever they could find to dig out from a storm that dropped about a foot of snow in central Oklahoma.
BY RANDY ELLIS rellis@opubco.com Published: February 3, 2011

Snow shovels and front-end loaders — and less conventional snow removal tools like a plastic office calendar — were out in full force Wednesday as metro-area residents used whatever they could find to dig out from a storm that dropped about a foot of snow in central Oklahoma.

“Where's my door?” asked Stella Bell-Craig, 54, of Edmond.

Bell-Craig had been shoveling snow for more than an hour, but still hadn't managed to clear a path through the 3-foot snowdrift that blocked the entrance to her office at GateKeeper Self Storage on Memorial Road.

Bell-Craig said she started digging with a shovel, but quickly discovered a large plastic-coated office calendar was more useful in scooping away the huge volume of snow that needed to be moved — just so she could get to work.

“I've got two days work waiting for me in there,” she said.

Bell-Craig said she only lives about 50 yards from the business, but Tuesday's blizzard was so bad she decided to wait until Wednesday before venturing out.

Skies were sunny and Tuesday's blizzard conditions were gone Wednesday, but they left behind about a foot of snow in the metro area that made travel extremely difficult — particularly in housing additions.

Jan Fees said she and her Edmond family decided to take her husband to work downtown at the American Precious Metals Exchange early Wednesday so they would have a four-wheel drive vehicle in case of emergencies.

“We had to rescue four cars just to get there,” Fees said, as she watched her son, Colton, and his friend, Zac Cumpston, shovel snow from the Fees family driveway.

A few blocks away, Erik White had a pair of shovels slung over his shoulders as he hiked about a half mile from his home to Memorial Road where he had made arrangements to meet a friend with a four-wheel drive. The friend had agreed to take him to work at 23rd Street Body Piercing in Oklahoma City.

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