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RedHawks' Koby Clemens carries on in the family business

Koby's father, legendary pitcher Roger Clemens, wasn't exactly known for his care-free attitude. But an intensity for baseball is apparent in the Rocket's son as well.
BY RYAN ABER, Staff Writer, raber@opubco.com Modified: June 16, 2011 at 5:53 pm •  Published: June 16, 2011
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Two hours before the RedHawks are scheduled to take on Memphis in early May, Koby Clemens bounced his head as Bruno Mars' “The Lazy Song” blasted out from the speakers at RedHawks Field at Bricktown.

Clemens mouthed the words and threw up his hands as he waited his turn in the batting cage.

Koby's father, legendary pitcher Roger Clemens, wasn't exactly known for this kind of care-free attitude.

Roger was known for his intensity on the baseball field — intensity that showed in Game 2 of the 2000 World Series during a first-inning showdown with Mike Piazza and plenty of other times during his 24-year major league career.

But when it's time for Koby to step into the cage — or have a conversation about the game with RedHawks hitting coach Keith Bodie — things change.

That intensity for baseball is apparent in Koby as well.

“My dad's real fun and outgoing too,” Koby said. “When he pitched and when he was on the mound, he was different. The switch was on. I got to see it. There's few guys that had that ‘it' factor and my dad had it and flipped that switch.

“But whether my dad did good or bad in games, as soon as the game was over, the switch was off and he was just my dad. He's honestly a big kid. We get after each other with whatever we're doing if it's bowling, playing cards, anything. We compete but we also have fun and goof around and we're not afraid to jab at each other a little bit.”

Koby's demeanor isn't the only thing that differs from his father. He's about five inches shorter and, while he's got a good shot to break into the majors at some point, he's not a phenom like his father.

Koby's laid-back attitude dials back a little when he talks about his father's legal troubles since he was indicted on six felony counts involving perjury, false statements and obstruction of Congress stemming from his testimony in front of a Congressional committee in 2008 after he was named in the Mitchell Report.

“It's brought us even closer,” Clemens said. “We're much tighter now than we were before. I just stay out of the bad news and don't pay attention to it.”

But he also understands the opinions people may have of his father and his family.

“Everybody's got their own opinion,” Clemens said. “You're allowed to have your own opinion. We're not going to ask you to change it but we're also not going to care what you think either.”

Roger has been at RedHawks Field several times this season but generally keeps a low profile.

“He comes and watches me just like any other dad would,” Clemens said. “He might critique me and have a little bit more knowledge of the game but he's the same, just like any other pops coming out here.”

Koby was born less than two months after Game 6 of the 1986 World Series, the infamous Bill Buckner game.

He grew up in clubhouses in Boston, Toronto, New York and Houston.

Clemens also grew up with legendary Astros Craig Biggio and Jeff Bagwell as neighbors.

“I got the chance to talk to a lot of these guys and when I was a kid, it wasn't as serious, but you're still hearing stuff that they're doing and just picking things up and watching.”

Since being drafted by the Astros in the eighth round in 2005, Koby has steadily worked his way up the Houston organizational ladder while bouncing around the field.

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KOBY CLEMENS BIO

Age: 24

Birthplace: Houston

Height: 5-11

Weight: 200

Bats/Throws: Right

Parents: Roger and Debbie Clemens

Drafted: 8th round, 2005 by the Astros

Notable: Won the California League batting title in 2009, hitting .345 and leading all minor league players with 123 RBIs. ... Was named the Astros' organization's Offensive Player of the Year that year. ... Was Double-A Corpus Christi's Co-Player of the Year last year, leading the Hooks in home runs, RBIs, double, runs and slugging percentage.

FATHER-SON DUOS

Koby Clemens is far from the only son of an ex-major leaguer working his way through the minors. Here are some of the more notable ones:

Bob and Michael Brenly

The younger Brenly, a catcher like his father, is in his second season with Class A Daytona in the Cubs system.

Delino and Delino DeShields Jr.

The 8th overall pick of the Astros in 2010, the 18-year-old has struggled at the plate so far at Class A Lexington.

Lenny and Cutter Dykstra

Dykstra moves to the Nationals organization this year after hitting .312 for Wisconsin last year in the Brewers organization.

Ron and Toby Gardenhire

The son of the Okmulgee native and current Twins manager is on the cusp of breaking through, playing his first full season at Triple-A Rochester in the Twins' system.

Garth and Cale Iorg

The shortstop, whose uncle Dane also played in the majors, is hitting .225 for Triple-A Toledo.

Don and Preston Mattingly

The son of the Dodgers manager and former Yankee standout is playing in the Dodgers' organization at Class A Great Lakes.

Jim and Chad Tracy

Tracy played last season for the RedHawks, breaking through with big numbers in his first Triple-A stint before injuries prematurely ended his season.

Andy and Scott Van Slyke

The outfielder has made Triple-A appearances in the last two seasons but has been assigned to Double-A Chattanooga.

Tim, Brett and Matt Wallach

Matt is in Double-A with the Dodgers, the organization which is father works for as a third-base coach. Matt was drafted by the Dodgers but traded to the Cubs, where he's pitched for Class A Daytona.

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