OKC metro area football notebook: G.B. Myles utilizing Northeast's athletes

BY SCOTT WRIGHT, Staff Writer, swright@opubco.com Modified: August 27, 2011 at 10:22 pm •  Published: August 27, 2011
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When he took the Northeast job in May, G.B. Myles realized he was coming into a school that just had state runners-up in boys basketball and boys track. So he knew there were good athletes, if he could pull them out to the football field.


So far, he's pleased with the turnout.

“We've got a lot of those athletes on the football field now,” Myles said. “We have 32 committed young men who want to do things the right way, work hard and turn the tide of things at Northeast in football.

“We've got 13 seniors and they bought in. They're doing it the right way.”

Michael Thomas is one of the team's top returning players, and Myles plans to utilize the athletic abilities of players like Aron Gaines, Chris McGrew and Trevyone Willis. That trio combined with Thomas to win state in the Class 3A 400-meter relay in the spring.

YOUTH KEY FOR CENTENNIAL

With some of their top players from last year moving to other programs, Centennial faces some growing pains this season, especially at the offensive skill positions.

But coach Michael Baldwin — who has been filling in for head coach Mark Ryan while he's out with an illness — is excited about the talents of those young players.

“We're rebuilding around a group of sophomores and freshmen,” Baldwin said. “Terry Davis and Malcolm Mitchell are good players, both outstanding athletes who will help us.

Avrin Johnson and Nick Sterling have the leadership qualities we need. They had a lot of playing time.”

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