OU did its part against Florida State, now it's up to OSU

by Berry Tramel Modified: September 18, 2011 at 11:57 pm •  Published: September 18, 2011

OK, Cowboys. Now it's your turn.

The Sooners took care of business. They won college football's game of the week, a 23-13 gutcheck against Florida State at loco Doak Campbell Stadium.

OU survived a game that in recent seasons it would have lost. And now 2011 stands ready to be a special Sooner season.

For 2011 to be a season for the ages in the whole danged state, now OSU has to win a game of similar challenge.

The seventh-ranked Cowboys go to eighth-ranked Texas A&M for a Saturday showdown that will be just the ninth top-10 matchup in OSU history. This is rare air for these Midnight Cowboys, who bested Tulsa 59-33 in a game that started at 12:15 a.m. Sunday and finished in the 3:30 range.

There couldn't have been 17 eyeballs outside the state still watching OSU-TU at such a witching hour, but much of America will watch Saturday in a game that will determine OU's chief competitor for what appears to be the final Big 12 championship.

And maybe's OU opponent in what could be a national semifinal late in the season.

We've been talking about how great ‘twould be a Bedlam showdown of unbeatens in December. But that was fanciful talk.

After the Sooners won a he-man game in Tallahassee, it's a little more realistic. If State does the same in College Station, let the hype begin.

The Sooners passed their test. It wasn't pretty. It wasn't the video-game football we've seen out of the Sooners in recent years. It was old-fashioned.

It was an NFL-type game. Yards hard to come by. Field goals precious (five were kicked; just three touchdowns were scored). One big play can either win it or at least wipe out the foe's big play. Ferocious hitting.

“Lot of big hits,” said Bob Stoops. “Very physical. Feels good to be in this environment, playing a physical team, and to respond the way we did.”

Some on Sunday morning were disappointed with the Sooner offense. They have been spoiled by college football's pyrotechnic trend in the 2000s.

Roughly two thirds of an elite team's games are glorified scrimmages, in which they can name the score.

Real football is played those other four or five games, games in which style counts for zero and defenses rise up as the force that determines victory.

“Domination,” said OU linebacker Travis Lewis of his unit's play. “Domination. Everybody was invested. Complete domination.”


by Berry Tramel
Columnist
Berry Tramel, a lifelong Oklahoman, sports fan and newspaper reader, joined The Oklahoman in 1991 and has served as beat writer, assistant sports editor, sports editor and columnist. Tramel grew up reading four daily newspapers — The...
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