Shortage of doctors a growing concern in Oklahoma

The Oklahoman Editorial Published: December 15, 2011
Advertisement
;

OKLAHOMA must take steps to address its physician shortage or the situation will get worse in a state that already ranks among the nation's least healthy. A recent New England Journal of Medicine article ranks Oklahoma as the state facing the most challenges in meeting medical needs.

The physician shortage will worsen as more doctors retire. In Oklahoma, one in four doctors is older than 60; their average age is 54. The physicians also will be serving more people as Oklahoma's pool of Medicaid patients swells under the new federal health care law.

Two Tulsa-based schools, the OU School of Community Medicine and the OSU Center for Health Sciences, have made easing the physician shortage a primary objective. The Legislature should consider the needs of these schools when allocating money for higher education.

Gerry Clancy, president of OU-Tulsa and dean of the School of Community Medicine, recently told the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education that the state's overall health will continue to deteriorate, particularly in rural areas with few or no doctors. Residents in those areas could see shorter life expectancies, he said.

Clancy and OU President David Boren asked regents to consider budgeting $500,000 annually for the school, which was established in 2008. Boren said the funding would signal a state commitment and help raise endowment money.

| |

Advertisement


Trending Now



AROUND THE WEB

  1. 1
    Check out the Thunder postseason playlist
  2. 2
    VIDEO: Blake Griffin dumps water on a fan
  3. 3
    Oklahoma City Thunder: Grizzlies guard Nick Calathes calls drug suspension unfair
  4. 4
    Dave Chappelle Reveals Shockingly Buff New Look
  5. 5
    Peaches Geldof Funeral to Be Held on Easter Monday
+ show more