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OSU football: Joseph Randle's production more important than ever

With the Cowboys looking for a new QB and big-play receiver, Randle's already impressive numbers need to grow in 2012.
BY GINA MIZELL, Staff Writer, gmizell@opubco.com Published: April 12, 2012

STILLWATER — Only five players in college football in 2011 compiled 1,200 rushing yards, 200 receiving yards and 20 total touchdowns.

Three were former Heisman finalists in Alabama's Trent Richardson, Wisconsin's Montee Ball and Oregon's LaMichael James. Another is San Diego State's Ronnie Hillman, considered to be a middle-round prospect in this year's NFL Draft.

The other was Oklahoma State's Joseph Randle.

It's difficult to fathom overlooking production like Randle had last season, where he totaled 1,216 rushing yards on 208 carries, 266 receiving yards on 43 catches and 26 total touchdowns. But that's life when you're on the same team as the dynamic quarterback-receiver duo of Brandon Weeden and Justin Blackmon.

Now Weeden and Blackmon are two weeks away from officially becoming NFL players, leaving Randle as the biggest offensive weapon returning for the Cowboys in 2012.

Is Randle ready to take over as the focal point of the Cowboy offense?

“I really don't look at it like that,” Randle said. “I don't even think Weeden and Blackmon looked at it like that. They just were themselves, and that was the media's job to (say), ‘Oh they're the face of the offense.' I'm just going to keep doing what I'm doing.”

In truth, Randle has felt like a veteran for a long time. That comes with tallying more than 400 yards both rushing and receiving as a true freshman and then replacing Kendall Hunter as the starting running back as a sophomore. Along the way, Randle was mentored by players like Weeden, who immediately started working extra with him on picking up the offense and told him to get on the jug machine so he would be ready to catch the quarterback's fastball.

“When you start making plays, that gives you more of a voice,” said Randle, who called his first career touchdown against Texas A&M the moment he felt like he could start leading. “If you haven't really been making plays, people don't listen to you as much.”

And for an offense that will have a fair amount of inexperience — most notably at quarterback — in 2012, Randle will be especially valuable. Not only as the guy Clint Chelf, J.W. Walsh or Wes Lunt can turn around and confidently hand the ball to, but as a guy who can catch the ball out of the backfield or split out at receiver.

OSU coach Mike Gundy maintains that the Cowboys' throw-first spread offense won't change dramatically this season, but based on the team's personnel, he does expect it to be more balanced than in 2011.

Of course, the Cowboys' strength at running back also comes from Jeremy Smith, a key member of what running backs coach Jemal Singleton calls OSU's “two-headed monster” who tallied 646 yards and nine touchdowns last season. Singleton notices that constant competition is what really drives Randle.

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