Class 2A slowpitch softball: Fort Cobb-Broxton defeats Roff for state title

After senior pitcher Jennifer Johnson caught a Roff line drive to secure her team's 13-3 victory, she went down on one knee and “Tebowed,” as did all of the Mustangs on the field.
BY JASON KERSEY Published: May 2, 2012
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Fort Cobb-Broxton's players were so confident they'd win the Class 2A slowpitch state title Wednesday at ASA Hall of Fame Stadium, they had their postgame celebration planned in advance.

After senior pitcher Jennifer Johnson caught a Roff line drive to secure the game's final out and her team's 13-3 victory, she went down on one knee and “Tebowed,” as did all of the Mustangs on the field.

Then, they brought it in for a dogpile in the circle.

“We basically knew we were going to win,” Johnson said.

The Mustangs, who entered the state tournament ranked No. 1 and the favorite, had to work for their final win, though.

Entering the top of the fifth inning, Fort Cobb trailed 2-1 despite having eight hits at the time. The Mustangs just couldn't get any of their runners home.

“Slow pitch is kind of that way,” said Fort Cobb coach Kelly Pierce. “It seems like one good hit leads to another.”

That's what happened in the fifth, when the Mustangs scored four runs and began pulling away from Roff. Then in the top of the seventh, with Fort Cobb up 6-2, they had what Pierce called their “best inning of the year.”

“In fact, those last three or four innings, that was the best we've hit it in a while,” Pierce said.

The win was particularly gratifying for the Mustangs. Wednesday marked their fifth straight slowpitch state championship game appearance but just their second win. The last came in 2009.

“It was something they really wanted this year,” Pierce said.



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