Band of Horses chomping at bit to hit Tulsa

Band of Horses reroutes their tour through Tulsa after the Railroad Tour derailment.
BY GENE TRIPLETT etriplett@opubco.com Modified: October 18, 2012 at 12:20 am •  Published: October 19, 2012
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It seems fitting that Ben Bridwell would be calling from a place called Mount Pleasant. The name evokes the same kind of woodsy, rustic setting as a lot of the music he makes with Band of Horses.

Of course, it's really a bustling suburban city and the fourth-largest municipality in South Carolina. But at least he's near family — when he's not on tour — which is the reason he moved back there several years ago.

“I don't get where the ‘Mount' comes from but it is certainly ‘Pleasant,' if not a little bit warm,” the singing, songwriting, guitar-playing Band of Horses leader said in a recent phone interview with The Oklahoman.

He wouldn't be home for long, however, as the alternative-country-rocking quintet was about to release their fourth full-length studio album, “Mirage Rock,” which would require a tour.

One leg of that tour was originally scheduled to travel by train, stopping in Oklahoma City among other places, with Willie Nelson and others on board as well, but that date was canceled when the Railroad Revival Tour derailed — figuratively speaking — due to logistics problems.

So Band of Horses is making it up to its Oklahoma fans with a rescheduled concert Tuesday at Cain's Ballroom in Tulsa — sans Willie Nelson and others.

“We've played Norman on the campus, and Oklahoma City and Tulsa as well,” Bridwell said. “And being kind of students of the Tulsa sound, we're fans of the area. Yeah, we've always had a good response in the area. I don't know if it's because we'll do the pandering and throw out a J.J. Cale cover or Leon Russell or somethin'. But whatever it is it seems to mesh well.”

The meshing could be due to the fact that there's a pretty sizable Oklahoma audience with a taste for Band of Horses' special blend of indie-rock (check out the rollicking “Knock Knock,” which opens the new album), country-pop (“How to Live”) and magnificently melancholic acoustic folk (“Slow Cruel Hands of Time”).

Grammy nominees

It's a recipe that won the group a Grammy nomination for their 2010 album “Infinite Arms.” And to perfect this tasty Americana-based formula, the band called in the long-standing British king of the studio console — Glyn Johns.

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