Oklahoma's winter trout fishing season begins Tuesday at Dolese, Medicine Park

Outdoors notebook: Fly fishing class on Illinois River
by Ed Godfrey Published: December 29, 2012
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The trout fishing season opens New Year's Day at the Dolese Park Youth Park Pond in Oklahoma City and at Medicine Park in southwest Oklahoma.

At Dolese Park, the annual two-month season begins Tuesday. All anglers between the ages of 16 and 62 must have a city fishing permit unless otherwise exempt. A state fishing license also is required.


Trout season regulations at Dolese include:

— A daily catch limit of six trout per person per day

— Anglers may only use one rod and reel, or pole, to catch trout

— Fish caught and placed on a stringer or in a bucket cannot be released back into the water

— Boat fishing is not allowed at Dolese Park Pond.

A free fishing clinic hosted by the Parks and Recreation Department and the Department of Wildlife Conservation will take place on Jan. 11 at the Putnam City High School gymnasium.

The free instructional clinic will be from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Registration is required by calling 755-4014.

The Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation's newest winter trout area also opens Tuesday at Medicine Creek in Medicine Park.

Medicine Creek replaces the winter trout area in southwest Oklahoma at Quartz Mountain.

Anglers only need a state fishing license to fish for trout at Medicine Creek. State wildlife officials will be stocking trout every other week at Medicine Creek and plan to stock some bigger fish for Tuesday's opener.

Fly fishing class on Illinois River

The Illinois River Fly Fishing School will be Feb. 8 and 9 at Tenkiller State Park on the banks of the Illinois River.

Instructors Mark Patton and Tom Adams will be teaching the two-day course which includes lessons on casting, equipment and flies.

The cost of the class is $150. For more information, call 340-1992.

by Ed Godfrey
Reporter Sr.
Ed Godfrey was born in Muskogee and raised in Stigler. He has worked at The Oklahoman for 25 years. During that time, he has worked a myriad of beats for The Oklahoman including both the federal and county courthouse in Oklahoma City for more...
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