Oklahoma Humanities Council announces awardees

Four individuals and one organization will be honored at the Oklahoma Humanities Council's dinner in March.
FROM STAFF REPORTS Published: December 30, 2012
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The Oklahoma Humanities Council announced the names of the 2013 awardees to be honored at its Oklahoma Humanities Awards dinner on March 28 at the Oklahoma History Center in Oklahoma City, 800 Nazih Zuhdi Drive.

“Under our mission to engage people with the humanities, it is fitting that we honor the people and organizations that are keeping culture — and our understanding of it — alive,” said Ann Thompson, the council's executive director, said in a news release. “The work they do is often behind the scenes, so we're happy to host this event to thank them for all the ways they make life and culture in Oklahoma more meaningful.”

Following are the 2013 Oklahoma Humanities Award recipients:

Arn Henderson, professor emeritus of architecture at the University of Oklahoma, will receive the council's highest honor, the Oklahoma Humanities Award, for his dedication to the humanities through his study of architecture as it relates to Oklahoma's past, present and future. Henderson is the author and co-author of numerous works including “Architecture in Oklahoma: Landmark and Vernacular” (1978), “The Physical Legacy: Buildings of Oklahoma County 1889-1931” (1980) and currently at press, “Bruce Goff: Architecture of Discipline in Freedom” (2012). His expertise and dedication helped in the preservation of Guthrie's commercial district.

Harbour Winn, professor of English and director of the Center for Interpersonal Studies through Film & Literature at Oklahoma City University, will receive the Public Humanities Award for his dedication to providing outstanding public programming across the state. Winn's work includes directing Oklahoma City University's Film Institute and the Thatcher Hoffman Smith Annual Poetry series. He is an active and popular scholar for “Let's Talk About It, Oklahoma!” and has created several new reading and discussion themes.

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