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Q&A on Collecting: Cyclops kept a watchful eye

Anne McCollam advises readers about the value of their antiques.
BY Anne McCollam, For The Oklahoman Published: January 7, 2013
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Q&A on Collecting

Cyclops kept a watchful eye

Q: This thing sat next to the piano where I practiced scales, (UGH!) when I was a child in the 1940s. The pot and the pedestal are in two pieces, and both are unmarked. There are geese or swans at the very top. On the lower section is what looks like a Cyclops eye and at the base, there are heads of mythical creatures on two feet. I always felt the “eye” was watching me as I plodded through 60 minutes of daily practice. It now belongs to me, but I know nothing about it. I have become quite fond of it and would like to learn more about its history. Can you help?

A: A plethora of jardinieres and matching pedestals were made in the early 1900s in both the United States and Europe. Most were marked with the name of the manufacturer. Those that were not make it difficult to identify their origins. Many were made in Ohio by McCoy Pottery, Weller Pottery, Roseville Pottery and Roseville Ransbottom Pottery. Original factory catalogs and other reference books are sources to help solve the mystery.

Your jardiniere and pedestal would probably be worth $700 to $1200.

Q: This mark is on the bottom of a glass dish with a matching lid that belonged to my great-aunt. The lid and dish both have gold filigree bands and are hinged. It is decorated with blooming pink roses against a cream-colored background and is in mint condition. The overall measurements are 5 inches in diameter by 4 inches high. Since I plan to pass it down to my daughter, I would like to be able to provide her with more information on its vintage and value.

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