Movie review: ‘The Last Stand'

Oklahoman Modified: January 17, 2013 at 5:11 pm •  Published: January 18, 2013

“The Last Stand” is the Arnold Schwarzenegger movie you didn't even realize you wanted to see.

This is the action superstar's first leading role in a decade, having left acting to serve as the governor of California and whatnot, and, while it may not have occurred to you to miss him during that time, it's still surprisingly good to see him on the big screen again.

He is not exactly pushing himself here. Korean director Kim Jee-woon's American filmmaking debut turns out to be an extremely Schwarzeneggerish Schwarzenegger film, full of big, violent set pieces and broad comedy. He may look a little creaky (and facially freaky) these days, but Arnold proves he's still game for the mayhem, and the movie at least has the decency to acknowledge that he's old.

The script also feels a bit old — “The Last Stand” is essentially an amped-up version of “Rio Bravo,” with some “Jackass”-style high jinks courtesy of Johnny Knoxville himself. But Kim keeps things moving. Everyone's just here for a mindless good time.

Schwarzenegger stars as Ray Owens, sheriff of the tiny Arizona border town of Sommerton Junction, the kind of place where everyone knows everyone and the locals sit around the diner trading folksy jokes. That's why the sheriff is immediately suspicious of some visitors sharing a booth over breakfast one morning — they clearly don't belong there. Andrew Knauer's script makes some passing mention of Owens' past career as a highly decorated Los Angeles police narcotics detective, which is intended to explain why this mild-mannered guy with the thick accent is such a tough guy.

Turns out these new folks (led by Peter Stormare) are there laying the groundwork for Mexican drug kingpin Gabriel Cortez (Eduardo Noriega), who's just escaped federal custody in Las Vegas in elaborate fashion. He's headed straight for the border at Sommerton with a hostage in the passenger seat in a stolen, souped-up Corvette that can reach speeds of 250 mph. While FBI agent John Bannister (Forest Whitaker) and his crew try in vain to chase Cortez, the sheriff and his makeshift posse set up a barricade.