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Super Bowl: CBS announcer Jim Nantz looking forward to postgame meeting of coaches

In covering the most-watched television event of the year, CBS will have two of its 62 cameras dedicated to each coach and will keep close tabs of the parents if they follow through on their plans to watch the game from the stands. The key for CBS is to avoid Harbaugh overkill.
by Mel Bracht Published: February 1, 2013
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By the end of CBS' telecast of Super Bowl XLVII Sunday night, viewers likely will be tired of sideline shots of coaches Jim and John Harbaugh reacting to plays or their parents, Jack and Jackie, trying to appear neutral in the Superdome crowd. But CBS announcer Jim Nantz said viewers need to be sure to stick around for one last moment of drama.

“When those two coaches meet at midfield when the game ends, I want to see that,” Nantz, who will be broadcasting his third Super Bowl, said in a conference call this week. “It's going to be one of the greatest moments ever … That is the ultimate shot of this game when two brothers meet at midfield, one a winner, one a loser with the biggest stakes in the sport and it's all just been settled. What are they going to look like?”

In covering the most-watched television event of the year, CBS will have two of its 62 cameras dedicated to each coach and will keep close tabs of the parents if they follow through on their plans to watch the game from the stands. The key for CBS is to avoid Harbaugh overkill.

“We show them (the coaches) a lot during a normal game anyway,” director Mike Arnold said. “If (either one of them) has got a great reaction, we want to make sure we see that on the air.”

Analyst Phil Simms, who will be calling his seventh Super Bowl — trailing only John Madden in Super Bowl assignments — promises to have fresh Harbaugh stories that have somehow haven't shown up in the deluge of pregame hype.

“I'm sure will come up some stories about both brothers that nobody knows, through experiences I've had with them or experiences they've had with people I know real well,” he said.

Technical innovation

What's a Super Bowl without some new gadgetry? CBS will show off its new high-speed “Heyeper Zoom” camera system, which debuted with its AFC playoff coverage.

“It basically allows you to zoom into replays and magnify the picture without losing as much clarity as you normally do,” said Sean McManus, CBS Sports chairman. “So if you're trying to see if a toe is in bounds or if a knee touches the ground or if the ball breaks the plane, you can zoom in and the shot is much clearer. You like to introduce something like that to the biggest television audience of the year, but you don't want to do it for the first time to get all the bugs out.”

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by Mel Bracht
Copy Editor, Sports Media
Mel Bracht is a copy editor on the presentation desk and also covers sports media. A 1978 graduate of Indiana University, Bracht has been a print journalist for 34 years. He started his career as sports editor of the Rensselaer (Ind.) Republican...
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