Q&A on Collecting: Vintage dinnerware made in occupied Japan

Anne McCollam advises readers about the value of their antiques.
BY Anne McCollam, For The Oklahoman Published: February 4, 2013
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Q&A on Collecting

Dinnerware made in occupied Japan

Q: This is a photo of a set of porcelain dinnerware that belonged to my mother. The set has 10 place settings, and each dish is marked “Occupied Japan — Royal Embassy — Atlanta.” There are no cups and saucers, and there are no salt or pepper shakers. The borders are decorated with blue designs and gold. I have heard that “modern people” do not use them because gold trimmed dishes cannot be placed in the microwave. I am planning to place the set for sale on the Internet and would like to know if $99 is a fair price. I appreciate “you're being there” to solve these kinds of questions.

A: Anything marked “Occupied Japan” was made during the Allied occupation of Japan from 1945 to 1952 after World War II. “Royal Embassy” is the maker, and “Atlanta” is the name of the pattern. Gold trimmed dishes should not be used in microwaves. The care and maintenance required for vintage porcelain dinnerware trimmed with gold does not appeal to many younger people today, and as a result, the demand on the secondary market is limited. FYI: Missing pieces can usually be found at china matching firms on the Internet. $99 is a fair price.

Q: What can you tell me about this mark? It is on the back of seven dinner plates, all with different buildings at Harvard University campus. The designs are blue against a white background. Also included with the mark are the words “Harvard University — 1941 — Veritas — James McDuffee and Stratton Co. — Boston.” Any information will be appreciated.

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