Share “Some troopers concerned about Highway...”

Some troopers concerned about Highway Patrol's ‘quota' policy

By Ziva Branstetter ziva.branstetter@tulsaworld.com Published: February 3, 2013
Advertisement

The Oklahoma Highway Patrol is using a formula to evaluate troopers based in part on the number of tickets they write and number of arrests made, records show.

One policy sets goals for northeastern Oklahoma's Troop L of about four tickets for every 10 traffic stops and 30 arrests per year for alcohol offenses. Some troopers say the new policy takes away their discretion to issue a warning rather than a ticket and are unhappy about the policies.

“I think it's detrimental to the way that the public sees me,” said one trooper.

The Tulsa World agreed not to publish the trooper's name, as well as the names of several other sources interviewed for this story. Troopers said they were concerned they could jeopardize their jobs if they spoke out publicly about the new policies.

Capt. George Brown, a spokesman for the patrol, said the policies are goals for 2013 that will be incorporated into troopers' “performance monitoring programs” as part of a quarterly review process. The goals — based on troop average data in different areas of the state — promote and ensure public safety, he said.

See the Tulsa World's complete story at www.tulsaworld.com


Did you know?

Highway Patrol

2013 goals

Records show Oklahoma Highway Patrol troopers are being judged on a formula that takes into account arrests, tickets written and contacts with the public. Troopers working in more than 20 divisions statewide are evaluated quarterly based on statistics driven by troop averages. Here are examples of some of the evaluation formulas from northeastern Oklahoma:

Contacts resulting in ticket

Exceeds standards: 39 percent and above

Meets standards: 30 to 38 percent

Needs improvement: 20 to 29 percent

Does not meet standards: 19 percent and below

Seat belt enforcement

Exceeds standards: 300 or more contacts

Meets standards: 150 to 299 contacts

Needs improvement: 100 to 149 contacts

Does not meet standards: 99 or below contacts

Contact per hour traffic patrol

Exceeds standards: 1.97 or more

Meets standards: 1.38 to 1.96

Needs improvement: 1.14 to 1.37

Does not meet standards: 0 to 1.13

SOURCE:

Oklahoma Highway Patrol

Trending Now


AROUND THE WEB

  1. 1
    NTSB report: Engines accidentally shut down in crash that killed former Oklahoma QB Steve Davis
  2. 2
    VIDEO: Russell Westbrook runs length of the court, throws down two-handed dunk against Sixers
  3. 3
    Bartlesville man sentenced to prison for feeding child marijuana
  4. 4
    Hundreds more correctional officers needed, director of prisons tells state Senate committee
  5. 5
    John Klein: They're both amazing, but Bill Self's run at KU is more impressive than Bob Stoops'...
+ show more