At a glance: Where several Oklahoma measures stand

Here's a look at where several significant issues stand after Oklahoma legislators completed their first month of this year's four-month session.
Modified: March 2, 2013 at 12:51 am •  Published: March 3, 2013
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At a glance

Measures' status

Here's a look at where several significant issues stand after legislators completed their first month of this year's four-month session.

Guns

• House Bill 1062 would allow public school teachers and administrators who successfully complete a special school resource officer course to bring loaded handguns to school. Waiting to be heard in the House.

• HB 2021 would provide for the manufacture or assembly of firearms, firearms accessories or ammunition in the state. The items cannot be sold or taken outside the state and as long as the items remain in Oklahoma, they would not be subject to federal law or federal regulations. Waiting to be heard in the House.

• HB 1775 would have allowed those convicted of nonviolent felonies the right to have a gun. Failed to pass a House committee; dead for two years.

Workers' compensation

• Senate Bill 1062 would overhaul Oklahoma's workers' compensation court and replace it with an administrative system. Passed the Senate and awaiting action in the House.

• HB 2201 would convert CompSource Oklahoma from a state entity to the new CompSource Mutual Insurance Co., a private, mutualized company owned by policyholders rather than the state. Waiting to be heard in the House.

Income taxes

• HB 1598 would drop the top personal income tax rate from 5.25 percent to 4.99 percent. Waiting to be heard in the House.

• HB 2032 would drop the top personal income tax rate from 5.25 percent to 5 percent. Waiting to be heard in the House.

• SB 585 would reduce the top personal income tax rate from 5.25 percent to 4.75 percent. Waiting to be heard in the Senate.

• SB 240 would have replaced Oklahoma's income tax structure with a flat tax of 2.95 percent. Not given a Senate hearing and considered dormant.

Marijuana

• SB 710 would have allowed patients with serious illness to obtain and use medical marijuana if recommended by their doctors. Failed to pass a Senate committee.

• HB 1835 would make the second offense of possessing marijuana a misdemeanor instead of a felony. A third offense would be a felony. Waiting to be heard in the House.

Horses

• SB 375 would revoke the state's 1963 law banning the sale of horse meat, which would end the prohibition on horse slaughtering or the sale of horse meat. Passed the Senate and awaiting action in the House.

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