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VORTEX2 Day 4 Back to Oklahoma

by Steve Sisney Modified: April 18, 2013 at 12:22 pm •  Published: May 13, 2009
Bad, overpriced breakfast at my okay hotel in Childress, Texas was followed by watching the VORTEX2 team (they stayed at the Hampton Inn) enjoy relative luxury and a free breakfast.  Now it is back to Oklahoma.
Jacob Carley, Purdue, uses his computer in luxuary in the lobby of the hotel as VORTEX2 prepares to leave the panhandle of Texas back to Oklahoma on Wednesday, May 13, 2009.  Photo by Steve Sisney, The Oklahoman
Jacob Carley, Purdue, uses his computer in luxuary in the lobby of the hotel as VORTEX2 prepares to leave the panhandle of Texas back to Oklahoma on Wednesday, May 13, 2009. Photo by Steve Sisney, The Oklahoman

After four days trying to shoot researchers deploying a research pod in the path of a storm, my safety minded driver drove past the deployment of the distrometer (laser rain guage) and by the time we turned around and I had jumped out of the car, the pod was out and on the ground.  I got off three frames with a flash on camera.  Two minutes and a mile later, the rain came in sheets, hail made the researchers put on bicycle helmets, and the light dropped to nothing.  My flash shorted out after a coouple shots of the outside of the van.  With my second camera maxed out at 3200 ISO I had to shoot at 1/15 second at f2.8.  One shot was somewhat sharp.

Isaac Hankes and research scientist Glen Romine from the University of Illinois deploy a laser distrometer to measure particle size, rate, and direction (raindrops) as members of VORTEX2 track an emerging super cell in central Oklahoma on Wednesday, May 13, 2009.  Photo by Steve Sisney, The Oklahoman
Isaac Hankes and research scientist Glen Romine from the University of Illinois deploy a laser distrometer to measure particle size, rate, and direction (raindrops) as members of VORTEX2 track an emerging super cell in central Oklahoma on Wednesday, May 13, 2009. Photo by Steve Sisney, The Oklahoman
Isaac Hankes and research scientist Glen Romine from the University of Illinois deploy a second laser distrometer to measure particle size, rate, and direction (of raindrops) as members of VORTEX2 track an emerging super cell in central Oklahoma on Wednesday, May 13, 2009.  Less than a mile from deploying the first unit, the light falls to almost nothing, the rain comes in torrents, and they must now don head gear to protect from the quarter sized hail.  Photo by Steve Sisney, The Oklahoman
Isaac Hankes and research scientist Glen Romine from the University of Illinois deploy a second laser distrometer to measure particle size, rate, and direction (of raindrops) as members of VORTEX2 track an emerging super cell in central Oklahoma on Wednesday, May 13, 2009. Less than a mile from deploying the first unit, the light falls to almost nothing, the rain comes in torrents, and they must now don head gear to protect from the quarter sized hail. Photo by Steve Sisney, The Oklahoman

–Steve Sisney

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by Steve Sisney
Photographer
Steve Sisney—married Brenda Joyce (Pierce) of Velma, Oklahoma in 1977. They have three children—Brent, Jason, and Tana; and four grandchildren. Sisney has been a staff photographer for The Oklahoman since 1987. He has photographed presidents...
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