Eric Maddox, military interrogator who orchestrated capture of Saddam Hussein, speaks at University of Oklahoma

In November 2003, Eric Maddox participated in a Delta Force team's raid of a fish pond in Iraq he hoped would turn up something that might lead the team to Saddam Hussein. Within the next few days, U.S. forces would have the deposed dictator in custody.
by Silas Allen Published: March 31, 2013
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— In November 2003, Eric Maddox participated in a Delta Force team's raid of a fish pond in Iraq he hoped would turn up something that might lead the team to Saddam Hussein.

Within the next few days, the U.S. Army would have the deposed dictator in custody.

Maddox, the military interrogator who orchestrated Hussein's capture, spoke Wednesday at the University of Oklahoma. Maddox, who hails from Sapulpa, graduated from OU in 1994.

At the beginning of his career as a military interrogator, Maddox was a bit out of his element, he said. He had served as a paratrooper in the Army's 82nd Airborne Division. Before Sept. 11, 2001, he had been working at the U.S. embassy in Beijing.

In 2003, Maddox volunteered to be a military interrogator. After going through a training program, he was sent to Tikrit, Hussein's hometown, to interrogate prisoners who were captured on raids by special forces teams.

At the time, the teams were searching for high value targets — those included in the famous deck of cards that coalition forces used to help troops identify members of the Hussein regime. Hussein himself was pictured on the ace of spades.

Maddox quickly learned that the interrogation techniques the Army had taught him wouldn't be effective in Tikrit. The Army had taught its interrogators to overwhelm subjects with damning information, eventually convincing the prisoner to turn over whatever he or she knew.

But that wouldn't work in Tikrit, Maddox said. During his rule, Hussein's forces would force confessions out of Iraqis and summarily execute them, he said. Most Iraqis had learned not to confess to anything under force for fear of being killed, he said.

“We were taught to forcefully convince them to give a confession,” he said. “Everything the Army had taught me wasn't going to work.”

So, Maddox developed a new way of dealing with prisoners. Rather than forcing a confession from them, Maddox began explaining to them that he wasn't interested in what they had done or putting them in jail. He was only interested in hearing any information they had. After that, he would send them home.

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by Silas Allen
General Assignment/Breaking News Reporter
Silas Allen is a news reporter for The Oklahoman. He is a Missouri native and a 2008 graduate of the University of Missouri.
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