Hybrid courses offer Oklahoma students a more flexible college experience

Jennifer Foster's class at the University of Central Oklahoma, in Edmond, is a hybrid course, a new alternative to traditional courses. Also known as blended courses, the classes fall somewhere between the more familiar classroom-based college classes and online courses.
by Silas Allen Published: April 7, 2013

— As students trickled into her public speaking class at the University of Central Oklahoma, instructor Jennifer Foster chatted with a few of them about work, what they'd done over spring break and plans for the summer.

Anytime Foster sees her students, there's plenty of ground to cover — the class only meets in person one evening a month.

Foster's class is a hybrid course, a new alternative to traditional courses. Also known as blended courses, the classes fall somewhere between the more familiar classroom-based college classes and online courses.

Colleges and universities across Oklahoma and nationwide are looking to the courses, as well as other online course formats, as a way to reach students who otherwise may not be able to go to college.

Unlike traditional courses, most of the content in hybrid courses is online. That content may include video lectures, reading assignments and tests. But unlike courses that are strictly online, the classes meet in person regularly, though typically not as frequently as traditional courses.

In Foster's class, students read over learning modules and complete assignments online. She uses the class sessions to put what students have learned into practice, often by giving speeches in front of classmates.

“All of the instruction is online,” she said.

When she first began teaching hybrid courses, most of Foster's students were working adult students who couldn't come to class in the middle of the day, several times a week. But recently, more of her students are traditional students who simply like the format.

Certain flexibility

Jacob Strassle, one of Foster's students, said the course format provides a certain amount of flexibility that other classes do not. Strassle, a guard on UCO's basketball team, said the format allows him to do coursework any time he's near a computer, even if he's on the road for a game.

Strassle, 19, said students in hybrid courses may need a certain amount of self-discipline that isn't required for traditional courses. Because the class only meets once a month, the student has to be more conscientious about getting work done between sessions and not waiting until the last minute.

“You get plenty of time,” he said.

If the student puts forth the effort, Strassle said, he thinks hybrid courses can be at least as effective as traditional classes. Students can go at their own pace, he said, and the fact that students complete lectures and assignments outside of class means class time is devoted to the main ideas.

Research appears to support that idea. A recent study suggests students who take hybrid courses learn as much as students in traditional, classroom-based courses.

A study, “Interactive Online Learning at Public Universities: Evidence from Randomized Trials,” was released in May by higher education research firm Ithaka S+R. According to the study, hybrid courses do no better or worse than their traditional counterparts at instructing students.

Although it might seem “a bland result,” the report suggests that conclusion is important because it indicates faculty concerns about how students will fare in hybrid courses compared to traditional courses are unfounded.

Continue reading this story on the...

by Silas Allen
General Assignment/Breaking News Reporter
Silas Allen is a news reporter for The Oklahoman. He is a Missouri native and a 2008 graduate of the University of Missouri.
+ show more


Trending Now


AROUND THE WEB

  1. 1
    Joe Biden Apologizes for Use of 'Shylocks'
  2. 2
    Nike suspends Adrian Peterson contract
  3. 3
    Why Dez Bryant throws up the 'X' after touchdowns
  4. 4
    VIDEO: OSU football takes you inside the Sherman Smith Training Center
  5. 5
    Map reveals the most educated town in every state
+ show more