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Thunder notebook; No time to celebrate or complain for Thunder

There will be no time for Thunder point guard Russell Westbrook to complain about the officiating against Houston, because the Rockets will quickly be headed in the other direction. Westbrook also might want to holster those imaginary pistols on converted 3-pointers.
BY JOHN ROHDE Published: April 20, 2013

There will be no time for Thunder point guard Russell Westbrook to complain about the officiating against Houston, because the Rockets will quickly be headed in the other direction. Westbrook also might want to holster those imaginary pistols on converted 3-pointers.

Westbrook's propensity to beg for foul calls or celebrate made shots could lead to some easy transition points for the Rockets, who finished as the NBA's second-highest scoring team (106.0).

“That's definitely been talked about,” OKC coach Scott Brooks said Saturday. “We can't get frustrated with calls. We have to get back. You make a basket, there's no celebrating. You miss the shot, you can't get frustrated and not hustle back.”

Game 1 of the Western Conference opening-round series is 8:30 p.m. Sunday at Chesapeake Energy Arena.

Westbrook and Sacramento's DeMarcus Cousins tied for the league lead with 15 technical fouls during the regular season, falling one tech short of having to serve a one-game suspension.

Westbrook isn't the lone culprit when it comes to complaining. The Thunder ranked second in the NBA in technical fouls with 95, which includes delay of game, defensive 3-second violations, et al.

The final regular-season standings for technicals: Westbrook 15; Kevin Durant and Kendrick Perkins 12; Serge Ibaka 7; Hasheem Thabeet 5; DeAndre Liggins, Thabo Sefolosha, Kevin Martin, Nick Collison and Brooks 2; Derek Fisher and Reggie Jackson 1.

HURRY BACK

Brooks has been stressing transition defense for the Thunder (60-22) against the Rockets (45-37), who lead the league in team fast-break efficiency and are second in fast-break points per game.

What exactly is transition defense?

“It's run back as quickly as you can and match up,” Brooks explained. “We want to make sure they get no open shots. As many times as we can have five guys in front of their five guys, we feel our defense is pretty solid and sound and we can make them miss. Transition offense is always looking for advantages — 4-on-3; 5-on-4. We try to limit that as many times as we can. … It doesn't really concern us who's guarding who, as long as somebody is guarded consistently.

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