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Oklahoma Rep. James Lankford blames 'pure politics' for air traffic controller furloughs

Oklahoma Republicans continue to say Federal Aviation Administration has alternatives, but White House says GOP lawmakers need to read the law they passed that mandated the budget cuts.
by Chris Casteel Published: April 26, 2013

Rep. James Lankford, whose Oklahoma City district includes the training center for the nation's air traffic controllers, said Thursday that the Obama administration is playing budget politics in requiring controllers to take furlough days.

“This is pure politics at its worst,” Lankford, a Republican, said. “They have plenty of money at FAA to be able to accommodate (budget cuts) without having to furlough workers and without having to delay the American public.”

Lankford joined several of his Republican colleagues at a Capitol Hill news conference to criticize the administration and the Federal Aviation Administration for furloughs that began Sunday and have been delaying flights across the country.

The FAA contends the furloughs of 15,000 air traffic controllers were made necessary by the budget cuts that went into effect last month. And the White House took issue this week with a main contention of Republicans — that the FAA could have absorbed the cuts without hitting air traffic controllers.

White House spokesman Jay Carney, responding to the charge the administration was trying to make the budget cuts as painful as possible, said Wednesday, “The law does not allow for the kind of flexibility when it comes to the FAA budget that some of these members — Republicans, principally — all claim it has.

“They should read the law. They wrote it, they should know what's in it,” Carney said.

Carney said the law “walls off” three-quarters of the transportation budget and doesn't allow any flexibility to reduce the impact on the FAA.

“Why? Because it was written to be a bad law,” Carney said. “It was written to be as onerous as possible.”

The budget cuts, known as the sequester, were part of the 2011 debt ceiling deal and called for $1.2 trillion in cuts over 10 years, with the Defense Department taking about half of the reductions. However, the cuts weren't expected to go into effect since they could have been replaced with more targeted cuts as part of a broad deficit reduction package.

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by Chris Casteel
Washington Bureau
Chris Casteel began working for The Oklahoman's Norman bureau in 1982 while a student at the University of Oklahoma. After covering the police beat, federal courts and the state Legislature in Oklahoma City, he moved to Washington in 1990, where...
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