Deadly highways: Two Oklahomans share stories of losing best friend

In the first 114 days of 2013, the Oklahoma Highway Patrol reported 113 fatalities. Nearly one-fourth of those crashes occurred on five highways — Interstate 44, Interstate 35, Interstate 40, U.S. 77 and State Highway 51.
by Adam Kemp Published: April 29, 2013

Billy Long attended his best friend's funeral in a wheelchair with his head stapled together. He was recovering from a punctured lung. Six screws reconnected his right wrist to the rest of the arm.

He had left the hospital without the staff's blessing, saying it wasn't an option to miss his friend's service.

He rubbed his hand along the side of the casket and said goodbye to Tyler Ford, his friend since he was 5.

The details of his accident in 2005 are blurry. Long remembers waking up in the hospital and seeing family members everywhere and trying to put his mother's mind at ease by telling her over and over he would be OK. And he remembers being disgusted when his brother held up a mirror to show him what the crash had done to his 17-year-old face and body.

But Long said what he will remember forever was the look on everyone's face when he asked how Tyler was doing.

“My mother and brothers left the room and a friend stayed and told me that Tyler didn't make it,” Long said. “I just remember how one minute we were hanging out being kids, and the next he was gone.”

When Long lost control of his Ford Mustang going nearly 100 mph on Interstate 40 in eastern Oklahoma County, the car skidded across the median and slammed head first into an oncoming Ford Expedition. Long was thrown nearly 200 feet. Ford died on impact.

A highway patrol trooper who worked the scene said the car “just disintegrated.”

“It was ignorance and being young and speeding,” Long said. “There is not a day that goes by that I don't think about Tyler and think about what could've been.”

Almost unavoidable

Death is nearly a daily occurrence on Oklahoma highways and county roads, according to the Oklahoma Highway Safety Office.

In the first 114 days of 2013, the Oklahoma Highway Patrol reported 113 fatalities. Nearly one-fourth of those crashes occurred on five highways — Interstate 44, Interstate 35, Interstate 40, U.S. 77 and State Highway 51.

The highway patrol reported 699 people died in wrecks in 2012, with the majority of those crashes on highways.

Mills Gotcher, a spokeswoman with the state Transportation Department, said the state's goal for 2013 is to lower that number to 685.

“We try to encourage people to buckle up and drive safe, but of course accidents happen,” she said. “People need to drive to get places and unfortunately not everybody drives safe. It's almost unavoidable.”

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by Adam Kemp
Enterprise Reporter
Adam Kemp is an enterprise reporter and videographer for the Oklahoman and Newsok.com. Kemp grew up in Oklahoma City before attending Oklahoma State University. Kemp has interned for the Oklahoman, the Oklahoma Gazette and covered Oklahoma State...
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My mother and brothers left the room and a friend stayed and told me that Tyler didn't make it. I just remember how one minute we were hanging out being kids, and the next he was gone.”

Billy Long,
Long's best friend,

Tyler Ford, was

killed in a 2005

accident that

also injured him.

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