The Okanola project at OSU was started to promote canola in Oklahoma

A winter canola expert said acres planted with the crop in Oklahoma have continued to increase in recent years.
by Bryan Painter Modified: May 9, 2013 at 8:23 pm •  Published: May 10, 2013
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photo - Photo by David McDaniel
Photo by David McDaniel

Winter canola not only catches the eyes of drivers passing the bright yellow fields, it has caught the attention of some Oklahoma agricultural producers.

Josh Bushong, the Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service winter canola extension specialist, said it is estimated that about 275,000 acres of winter canola were planted in the southern Great Plains states.

“It's been on a pretty steep incline,” Bushong said.

Bushong explained that farmers harvest the seed and then the canola crushers will crush that seed for its oil. And he added that the local markets have and are expected to continue to increase.

The canola in this area is primarily used for cooking oil.

“We started the Okanola project at OSU here back in 2003-2004 to promote canola in Oklahoma,” he said. “Basically we started in order to try to give wheat farmers an option to rotate with.”

Bushong said this is a winter crop that grows the same time as winter wheat does. Why rotate? He said that there are wheat fields that have “grassy weeds” in them and some of the weeds have started showing resistance to some herbicides.

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by Bryan Painter
Assistant Local Editor
Bryan Painter, assistant local editor, has 31 years’ experience in journalism, including 22 years with the state's largest newspaper, The Oklahoman. In that time he has covered such events as the April 19, 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah...
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