U.S. Open: Hunter Mahan says tough day at Merion will benefit him

Hunter Mahan, desperately trying to something happen at the end, finished with a double bogey and back-to-back bogeys to wind up in a four-way tie for 4th at five-over. Yet, disappointed as he was, the former OSU standout wouldn't let it detract from his overall experience.
BY JON MARKS For The Oklahoman Published: June 16, 2013
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photo - Hunter Mahan reacts after a putt on the 13th hole during the fourth round of the U.S. Open golf tournament at Merion Golf Club, Sunday, June 16, 2013, in Ardmore, Pa. (AP Photo/Morry Gash) ORG XMIT: USO242
Hunter Mahan reacts after a putt on the 13th hole during the fourth round of the U.S. Open golf tournament at Merion Golf Club, Sunday, June 16, 2013, in Ardmore, Pa. (AP Photo/Morry Gash) ORG XMIT: USO242

— If you blinked you might've missed it, but for one brief shining moment yesterday afternoon Hunter Mahan found himself alone atop the leader board here at the U.S. Open at fabled Merion. Just moments later Justin Rose holed a 20-footer for birdie to draw even.

It proved an omen. Rose, deadlocked with Mahan and birthday boy Phil Mickelson with just three holes to play, shrugged off the pressure to par in the rest of the way while the others faltered down the stretch to win the Open by two shots over Mickelson and Australian Jason Day.

Mahan, desperately trying to something happen at the end, finished with a double bogey and back-to-back bogeys to wind up in a four-way tie for 4th at five-over. Yet, disappointed as he was, the former OSU standout wouldn't let it detract from his overall experience.

“I played hard until the end and can't be disappointed or too down with the results,'' said the 31-year-old Mahan, who at least did get bragging rights over fellow former Cowboy Rickie Fowler, who tied for 10th at seven-over. “It was brutally hard; a difficult test.

“It was rowdy and different today playing with Phil. I probably heard ‘Happy Birthday' 18 times.

“But it was fun.”

And something Mahan insists will benefit him in the long run.

“I stepped onto the tee today not knowing I was going to win,'' said Mahan, who, after starting the day one off Mickelson's pace at even par, had 13 pars and a single bogey before he unraveled over the final four holes. “I left the 18th green knowing I could win, so it's all good.

“Being in the last group is important. It's different than any other event, but it's not different from playing golf.

“You have to go out there and do it. Dealing with adrenaline and excitement it's good to be there, because every time you get back there again you feel a little more calm.''