Global renewable energy growing fast, agency says

Developing countries are building more wind, solar and hydroelectric power plants to meet rising power demand and combat local pollution problems.
By JONATHAN FAHEY Published: June 27, 2013
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— Renewable energy is growing fast around the world and will edge out natural gas as the second-biggest source of electricity, after coal, by 2016, according to a five-year outlook published Wednesday by the International Energy Agency.

Developing countries are building more wind, solar and hydroelectric power plants to meet rising power demand and combat local pollution problems. And the costs of renewables are falling below the cost of traditional power sources such as coal, natural gas and oil in some markets with high-priced power.

Renewable power, including hydropower, is the fastest-growing power generation sector and it is expected to increase by 40 percent in the next five years. By 2018, it will make up a quarter of the world's energy mix, according to the report, up from 20 percent in 2011.

But 80 percent of the renewable power generated in the world is hydropower, a technology frowned upon by environmental groups and sustainability experts because it requires the construction of dams that can damage river ecosystems.

Non-hydroelectric sources such as wind, solar, geothermal and energy derived from plants are expected to grow quickly, but they contribute a far smaller amount of energy to the global mix. These technologies will supply 8 percent of the world's energy by 2018, up from 4 percent in 2011 and 2 percent in 2006.

Still, renewable power is facing uncertain times as subsidies in developed countries wane. Investment in renewable projects fell in 2012, according to the International Energy Agency, an energy security and research organization based in Paris that serves 28 oil-importing countries, including the U.S.

In a report published in April, the agency said the world's energy is no cleaner than it was 20 years ago because of rising reliance on coal-fired generation in China, India, and parts of Europe are phasing out nuclear power while natural gas prices rise.