Redlands Community College in El Reno will abolish dairy goat enterprise

El Reno's Redlands Community College will end its dairy goat auxiliary enterprise as one of its first steps in dealing with the college's current financial crisis, Redlands acting President Jack Bryant announced Monday.
by Randy Ellis Modified: July 1, 2013 at 9:23 pm •  Published: July 2, 2013

Redlands Community College will end its dairy goat auxiliary enterprise as one of its first steps in dealing with the college's current financial crisis, Redlands acting President Jack Bryant announced Monday.

Redlands officials also chose not to renew contracts of four full-time employees and are reviewing part-time contracts to see which of those should be allowed to expire, he said.

Redlands administrators and regents are working to make cuts in the college's $10 million-a-year operating budget after a financial analysis requested by the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education revealed Redlands had more than $1.1 million in unpaid obligations, including some bills more than six months past due.

Longtime Redlands President Larry Devane, 67, resigned June 24. Bryant was named acting president three days later.

Bryant said his top goal in considering cuts is to make sure they have as little impact on student learning as possible. Redlands officials have not targeted any academic programs or courses for elimination, he said.

“No classes are being canceled because of this financial situation,” he said.

Bryant said he sent out an email to Redlands students last week assuring them that their education would continue uninterrupted.

“We will still honor all scholarships that have been released,” he said.

As with all colleges and universities, a course offering could be dropped if there is low enrollment, he said, adding it is also possible some programs may have to be scaled back.

Redlands expects to save at least $200,000 to $250,000 by selling off its 42 dairy goats and discontinuing its dairy goat operations, which have not performed up to financial expectations, Bryant said.

“I will be selling off the herd,” he said. “We're basically killing that program.”

Closing the dairy will save the college about $1,000 a week on feed, he said.

Bryant said he plans to ask regents to declare the dairy equipment surplus so it can be sold.



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