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Landowners using food plots to attract wildlife

As more land is being bought for hunting, more landowners are using food plots to attract wildlife.
by Ed Godfrey Modified: July 27, 2013 at 6:02 pm •  Published: July 27, 2013
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photo - A deer food plot workshop is planned Friday near Slaughterville. The Noble Foundation in Ardmore also has scheduled a white-tailed deer management workshop in Norman on Sept. 19. Photo provided by Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation  Photo provided by Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation
A deer food plot workshop is planned Friday near Slaughterville. The Noble Foundation in Ardmore also has scheduled a white-tailed deer management workshop in Norman on Sept. 19. Photo provided by Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation Photo provided by Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation

Planting a food plot doesn't guarantee a hunter will kill a 200-inch deer, but it will increase his chances.

While food plots are not a substitute for good native habitat, they are an important part of wildlife management in Oklahoma, said Heath Herje, agriculture educator for the Cleveland County Cooperative Extension, a branch of Oklahoma State University.

More land traditionally used for agriculture in Oklahoma is being bought for the purposes of recreation, mostly hunting and fishing, Herje said.

“That's the trend we are seeing more and more,” Herje said.

And as more land is being bought for hunting, more landowners are planting food plots to attract wildlife, especially deer and turkey.

“A lot of the soil samples I look at are for food plots,” Herje said. “It's a hot topic. I get calls about it all the time.”

For that reason, the Cleveland County Cooperative Extension is holding a deer food plot workshop on Friday near Slaughterville on the property of one landowner who is using food plots in deer management.

Many landowners plant both cool and warm season food plots for wildlife. The lean times of late winter and late summer are the most important times to provide food for deer, but Herje recommends food plots year-round.

In the fall, food plots are important to attract does to the area if landowners need to increase the doe harvest on their property, Herje said.

From a nutritional standpoint, the most important time for bucks to have food plots is from April through September during the antler growing period, he said.

Food plots can help increase the body size of a buck and improve antler growth. For does, the food plots can help ensure healthy fawns.

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by Ed Godfrey
Copy Editor, Outdoors Editor, Rodeo, River Sports Reporter
Ed Godfrey was born in Muskogee and raised in Stigler. He has worked at The Oklahoman for 25 years. During that time, he has worked a myriad of beats for The Oklahoman including both the federal and county courthouse in Oklahoma City for more...
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