Oklahoma football: A look at what went into Aaron Colvin's decision to stick around for his senior season

Cornerback Aaron Colvin chose to play one last season at Oklahoma, where several personal and team goals remained unaccomplished. Given his parents' lifelong emphasis on education and finishing things you start, Colvin's decision isn't terribly surprising.
by Jason Kersey Published: August 3, 2013

NORMAN — Shortly after his junior season ended in embarrassing fashion — Oklahoma's 41-13 Cotton Bowl shellacking from Texas A&M — Aaron Colvin retreated home to Owasso, seeking some much-needed peace for a mind swarming with weighty, complicated factors.

The first-team All-Big 12 cornerback received an encouraging pre-NFL Draft grade, making a second- or third-round selection possible. Would his stock be higher or lower with another collegiate season? Would returning to Norman mean missing his peak draft positioning?

“If I had to put a percentage on it, he was 75-percent ready to leave school and enter the draft,” said his dad, Bryant Colvin. “He didn't actually tell us how close he was, but I know my son.”

Aaron Colvin ultimately picked one last season at Oklahoma, where several personal and team goals remained unaccomplished. Given his parents' lifelong emphasis on education and finishing things you start, Colvin's decision isn't terribly surprising.

Still, a bevy of considerations made the 2013 NFL Draft tough to resist. Oklahoma would return few defensive starters in 2013. By the time he arrived home in Owasso to think things over, he already knew safety Tony Jefferson — one of his closest friends — would skip his senior season to pursue the NFL dream.

“He just kind of went into a silent place for a while,” said his mother, Lisa Colvin. “He was just weighing all his options. The Cotton Bowl loss was tough. He knew Tony was leaving, and he is truly his brother. They are the best of friends. Just looking at the whole picture, losing all those guys on defense ... He was really close (to leaving).”

A blue-collar family

Aaron Colvin was born in Nashville, Tenn., and raised by a pair of hard working, blue-collar parents.

Bryant and Lisa Colvin didn't force sports upon their three sons, but did insist they stay busy with extracurricular activities.

“You're gonna play an instrument; you're gonna do something, and you're gonna do it to the best of your ability,” Bryant said.

The family moved after Lisa was transferred to Tulsa. Bryant is part owner of a sheet-metal company.

Aaron's schedule often kept him too busy to work any jobs — except when he got in trouble.

“Every time he did something wrong, I'd make him come to the shop and work,” Bryant Colvin remembered.

He'd find something really strenuous work for Aaron, then ask, “Do you wanna do this the rest of your life?”

“Heck no, dad,” Aaron would respond.

“Then go to school; get your degree.”

Colvin will graduate with a bachelor's degree in December, attaining a goal that has always been vitally important to his parents.

“You've gotta have a degree now,” Lisa said. “He loves football and we love it as well, but that's an opportunity given for you to get your degree.

“Me and his dad are blue collar. That's not what we want for them. There's nothing wrong with it, but it's hard work. We want them to use their minds and not just physical labor.”


by Jason Kersey
OU Sports Reporter
Jason Kersey became The Oklahoman's OU football beat writer in May 2012 after a year covering high school sports and OSU recruiting. Before joining the newspaper in November 2006 as a part-time results clerk, he covered high school football for...
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