The Digital Desk

NewsOK | BLOGS

Mary's Miscellanea: Mosquitos, blooms and a llama

Mary Phillips Modified: August 5, 2013 at 2:10 pm •  Published: August 5, 2013
Courtesy, Centers for Disease Control - A Culex quinquefasciatus mosquito on a human finger. The Culex quinquefasciatus mosquito is proven to be a vector associated with transmission of the West Nile Virus.
Courtesy, Centers for Disease Control - A Culex quinquefasciatus mosquito on a human finger. The Culex quinquefasciatus mosquito is proven to be a vector associated with transmission of the West Nile Virus.
• Mosquitoes!!!
They’re back in the news!
West Nile virus has been detected in mosquitoes in Tulsa.
Only a scientist could love mosquitoes.
My entire life, mosquitoes have looked on me as a banquet table.
I believe if there were only one mosquito within 100 miles, it would dine on me.
This wet summer seems to be bringing them out in droves, so there is no enjoying 
a summer evening on the porch for me. Just stepping across the front porch to
get the mail can net me at least two bites.
For me, it’s bring on the cold, crisp nights of autumn and say goodbye to the stinging bug.
or go to the Oklahoma City-County Health Department website at https://www.occhd.org/community/environmentalprotection/mosquito
• My paternal grandmother and my father had it. My aunt, Grace Helms, has it.
I did not inherit it.
I do not have a green thumb.
The ivy that sets in my window at work needs the brown leaves removed.
At home, my aloe vera looks sad. It is surviving but only because of the rain.
The only plants I have are perennials that can thrive on their own.
My blue hardy phlox, irises and two rose bushes survive my benign neglect and generally flourish.
The heavy rains that we enjoyed beat my phlox on their tall stalks down until they blocked the sidewalk, and
I was afraid the postman would skip my house, so I cut them back.
My other two flowering plants that are now putting on a show are the crape myrtles, in bloom with red, white and lavender, and
my patch of surprise lilies that bloomed this past week.
If you look across the city, you can see patches of pink lilies on their tall stalks.
You can see how they got the name naked ladies. Their leaves come up in the spring and then disappear and the flowers on their “naked”
stalks are a startling surprise when they appear in late July or August.
The crapes seem to love the hot, humid days of summer, and it seems that in the last week or so, the reds have started blooming
their hearts out.
Crapes love Oklahoma weather, and Oklahomans seem to love them, too.
Most neighborhoods boast at least one crape myrtle showing off their summer color.
The Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service through Oklahoma State University offers a fact sheet on perennial flowers at http://pods.dasnr.okstate.edu/docushare/dsweb/Get/Document-1072/HLA-6410web%20color.pdf
Three colors of crape myrtles in Midwest City.
Three colors of crape myrtles in Midwest City.
• 75 years ago
The front page of The Oklahoman for Aug. 7, 1938, brought the news that zookeeper Leo Blondin had found transportation to take a lion cub, town black wolves and an African sheep to the Rocky Mountain Zoo in Denver, CO, and they would send a male llama home to the Lincoln Park zoo’s widowed Mamma, the llama.
The Oklahoma Publishing Co.’s own Mistletoe Express came through with a truck and a driver.
Read this story and more in The Oklahoman’s Archives

Trending Now


AROUND THE WEB

  1. 1
    VIDEO: FSU's Jameis Winston sent to locker room by Jimbo Fisher after dressing out for Clemson game
  2. 2
    Big 12 football: K-State's Snyder among nation's most underrated coaches in ESPN poll
  3. 3
    Texas A&M fan wearing what appears to be a chain mail jersey
  4. 4
    Satanic black mass seeks to free people from influence of God, organizer says
  5. 5
    Owasso beats Jenks for first time since 1993; Union rolls past BA
+ show more