Oklahoma company aims to turn waste into electricity

An Oklahoma-based startup company intends to turn trash into electricity, using a process that creates energy by speeding up the decomposition of waste materials.
by Jay F. Marks Modified: August 30, 2013 at 9:00 am •  Published: August 29, 2013

A Shawnee-based energy company intends to help the world tackle two of its toughest problems at the same time.

Evolution Renewable Energy Inc., a five-person partnership, is trying to line up investors to commercialize its process for turning trash into electricity.

Tony Wall, the company's chief financial officer, calls the process “one of the most significant developments of the 21st century.”

Wall said it can deal with the “unbelievable amount” of waste being created by society, while providing a self-sustaining source of electrical generation.

He said the fledgling company is raising money to build a mobile prototype that uses its “sustained thermokinetic accelerated radiation technology,” known as STAR TEK.

CEO Garry Sexton said the process works on a molecular level, creating energy by rapidly breaking down waste material.

“We decrease the decomposition time from what would normally take several hundred or a thousand years into a few seconds or a minute,” he said. “During that time, we're actually breaking it apart in a way that would occur naturally.”

Sexton said it is a cheaper way to produce electricity.

“By utilizing waste materials as the fuel, or what we call feedstock, we can reduce the cost of production,” said Sexton, an engineer with extensive experience in South Korea and China. “At the same time, we eliminate some environmental problems.”

He said Evolution's process, which he described as a “flameless, conversion technology,” uses up about 98 percent of its feedstock, leaving behind an inert product free of chemicals or pathogens that can be used for other purposes or put into a landfill.

Wall said leftover ashcan be used in concrete, road materials or anything else that needs filler.


by Jay F. Marks
Energy Reporter
Jay F. Marks has been covering Oklahoma news since graduating from Oklahoma State University in 1996. He worked in Sulphur and Enid before joining The Oklahoman in 2005. Marks has been covering the energy industry since 2009.
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