Chapel takes shape at women's prison in McLoud, OK

Inmates and volunteers are working to build a new prison chapel at Mabel Bassett Correctional Center in McLoud, the state's maximum-security prison for women.
by Carla Hinton Modified: September 17, 2013 at 9:33 pm •  Published: September 18, 2013

Inmates and volunteers worked side-by-side Tuesday to build a new prison chapel at Mabel Bassett Correctional Center.

The chapel construction project at the state's maximum-security prison for women is funded through private donations from churches and individuals across Oklahoma and other states. The project, coordinated through a faith-based group called World Mission Builders, took several years to bring to fruition.

The Rev. Charles Freyder, a chaplain at the prison, said many inmates wanted to help build the chapel and they could hardly contain their excitement.

“To watch the walls and the rafters go up within a two- or three-day period has been awesome,” Freyder said.

“It's a beautiful sight.”

Inmate Nina Walker, 39, of Altus, agreed.

“It's the most amazing experience for many of us here in Mabel Bassett,” she said. “It just makes our hearts soar.”

The Rev. Joe Wilson, domestic coordinator for World Mission Builders, said the chapel project is ahead of schedule thanks to the diligent work of more than 50 volunteers and a group of dedicated inmates. Groundbreaking for the chapel was held on Aug. 22 and the foundation was poured Sept. 3. Wilson said the walls were erected Monday. The trusses were raised Tuesday.

Wilson, of Enid, said the chapel will include classrooms, offices, a library and baptistery. He said the prison at Mabel Bassett is the fifth built through an “old fashioned barn-raising” effort, costing about $500,000 in funding and in-kind goods and services. He said the project lacks $100,000, and he is seeking a brick layer and donations of red brick and a roof.

He said he is not worried about donations because numerous people have already come together to see the project get this far. Wilson said the volunteers building the chapel will live out of their recreational vehicles parked near the prison's maintenance area until the project is complete. He said he has been impressed with the dedication of the inmates who have worked alongside volunteers to see the chapel take shape.


by Carla Hinton
Religion Editor
Carla Hinton, an Oklahoma City native, joined The Oklahoman in 1986 as a National Society of Newspaper Editors minority intern. She began reporting full-time for The Oklahoman two years later and has served as a beat writer covering a wide...
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